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DETAILS 


TABLE OE CONTENTS 


08.15 



VOLUME 33 ISSUE 09 


FEATURES 


74 I THE FIGHTER 

Jake Gyllenhaal 
hollowed himself 
out to play a desper- 
ate scavenger in 
Nightcrawler, then 
packed on 15 pounds 
of muscle to embody 
a tormented brawler 
in this month’s 
Southpaw, the latest 
in a string of in- 
tensely dark and per- 
sonal projects that 
continue with next 
month’s high-alti- 
tude survival thriller 
Everest. Think Hol- 
lywood’s reigning 
shape-shifter (and 
once-again Oscar 
contender) might 
take a minute to 
pat himself on his 
rippling back? 

Think again. 

By Joe Levy 


86 I THE EIGHT 
ARTISTS TO WATCH 
RIGHT NOW 

With auction prices 
hitting the strato- 
sphere, museums 
opening every other 
week, and celebs 
like Kanye and Leo 
snapping up new 
works, the search is 
on for the next big 
thing. These are the 
up-and-comers you 
need to know. 

By Maxwell Williams 

96 1 ARMANI AT 40 

To celebrate 
Giorgio Armani’s 
four decades at the 
forefront of men’s 
fashion, the 
designer’s Holly- 
wood collaborators — 
A-listers like 
De Niro, Scorsese, 
and Gere — pay 
tribute to a career 
devoted to making 
men look their best, 
onscreen and off. 


COVER Photograph by Mark Seliger. Styling by Benjamin Sturgill. Clothing by Dior Homme. 


DETAILS IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT ©2015 CONDE HAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED PRINTED IN THE U.SA. VOLUME 33. NO. 09. DETAILS (ISSN 0740-4921] Is published monthly (except for 
combined Issues In December/January and June/July) by Conde Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Conde Nast, One INorid Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. S. I. Newhouse, Jr, Chairman: 
Charles H. Townsend, Chief Executive Officer; Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr, President; David E. Geithner. Chief Financial Officer; Jill Bright, Chief Administrative Officer. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY and at additional mailing 
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OR BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES: Please write to DETAILS, P.O. Box 37701, Boone, lA 50037-0701, call 800-627-6367, or email DETcustserv@cdsfulfillment.com. Please give both new and old addresses as printed on most recent label. 
Subscribers: If the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. If during your subscription term or up to one year after the magazine 
becomes undeliverabie, you are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know. You will receive a full refund on all unmailed issues. First copy of new subscription will be mailed within four weeks after receipt of order. Address 
all editorial, business, and production correspondence to DETAILS Magazine, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. For reprints, please contact reprints@condenast.com or 717-505-9701 ext. 101. For re-use permissions, 
please contact permissions@condenast.com or 800-897-8666. Visit us online at www.details.com. To subscribe to other Conde Nast magazines on the World Wide Web. visit www.condenastdigital.com. Occasionally, we make our 
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DETAILS AUGUST 201 5 


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DETAILS 


TABLE OE CONTENTS 


08.15 



FASHION 


64 I TRACK SUITS 

Bold geometric pat- 
terns, easier fits, and 
unexpected fabrics 
{like corduroy) are 
here to shake up 
your workday staple. 
Photographs by 
Ryan Plett 

80 I BLUE IN THE 
FACE 

The traditional 
timepiece — white 
face, black numerals 
—is so 2014. For fall 
and beyond, draw 
attention to your 
wrist with a classic 
watch in a color 
you’d sooner find in 
a sport coat: navy. 
Photographs by 
Lionel Koretzky 


KNOW & TELL 


19 I ARCHITECTURE 

Taschen’s two- 
volume collection 
of contemporary 
concrete buildings 
is a solid addition to 
any home library. 

20 I DRINKS 

Whether you’re 
walking into a party 
with beer, wine, or 
liquor, here’s how to 
bring it better. 

24 I SOCIAL MEDIA 

These four apps 
will elevate your 
’gram game. 

26 I DESIGN 

Houseplants are the 
new must-have ac- 
cessory in luxe apart- 
ments. And now you 
can transform any 
room into a green 
zone with statement 
planters in bright 
shades and angular, 
twisting shapes. 


28 I THE STARLET 

How Swede it is to 
be Alicia Vikander, 
suddenly the most 
in-demand young ac- 
tress in Hollywood. 

30 I YES LIST 

Five things we em- 
phatically endorse 
this month. 

32 I BODY 

Welcome to the 
world of $199 foam 
rollers and $1,750 
compression boots, 
where gym rats 
spend as much time 
recovering from 
workouts as they do 
working out— and 
they’re happy to tell 
you all about it. 

34 I ETIQUETTE 

Who gets tipped? 
Who doesn’t? And 
do you really need 
to leave 75 percent 
on a latte? New rules 
for confusing times. 


36 I CULTURAL DIET 

Singer-songwriter 
Jason Isbell on the 
best drum solos and 
the only corn bread 
worth crying over. 

38 I FOOD 

The “It” Dish 
deconstructed: 

At Hattie B’s in 
Nashville, chef John 
Lasater’s chicken 
brings the heat. 

40 I WISEGUY 

Pierce Brosnan 
sounds off on mar- 
riage equality in 
Ireland (all for it), 
the paparazzi in- 
festation in Hawaii 
(not a fan), and how 
to bring James Bond 
into the 21st century 
(enough with the 
straight white guys). 


42 I TECH 

An exploding genre 
of YouTube videos 
are boring viewers 
to sleep — and that’s 
the whole point. 

44 I OBJECTS 
OF DESIRE 

Spearguns, ship- 
wreck maps, wet 
suits — all the essen- 
tials you need to live 
the life aquatic. 


47 I SPECIAL 
SECTION: THE 
STYLISH MAN’S 
FALL CHEAT SHEET 

Escher-style sweat- 
ers, new (old) soles 
for your sneakers, 
and the season’s 
chicest action flick 
are just a few things 
you’ll learn about in 
this ultimate guide 
to fall fashion. 


58 I TASTEMAKER 


Hammond Jr. on his 
favorite fragrance 
(hint: Your girlfriend 
might wear it) and 
the art of going 
custom. 

60 I GROOMING 

For some South Ko- 
rean men, a 10-step 
skin-care routine is 
standard. For us? 
We’ll see. Until then, 
prepare to make 
shelf space for mists 
and sheet masks. 


100 I SHOULD YOU.. 
FAST? 

Can skipping meals 
help you lose 
weight, live longer, 
and feel younger? 
We weigh the pros 
and cons of life in 
the fast lane. 

By Meredith Bryan 


Rocker Albert 


STYLE 


LAST WORD 


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DETAILS 


AUGUST 201 5 


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08.15 



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DEHALS 


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Daniel Peres 

CREATIVE DIRECTOR 

Rockwell Harwood 

MANAGING EDITOR 

Diana Benbasset 

EXECUTIVE EDITOR 

Alex Bhattacharji 

DESIGN DIRECTOR 

Nathalie Kirsheh 

PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR 

Ashley Horne 

EDITOR-AT-LARGE 

Andrea Oliveri 

FEATURES 

ARTICLES EDITOR 

Bret Begun 

ENTERTAINMENT DIRECTOR 

David Walters 

FEATURES EDITOR 

David Swanson 

SENIOR EDITOR 

Josh Condon 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Laura Bolt 

Antonina Jedrzejczak 
Jon Roth 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT 

Kevin Pires 

ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Eliza Florendo 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Howie Kahn 

Monica Khemsurov 

Jonathan Miles 

Adam Sachs 

Kayleen Schaefer 
JackWright 


FASHION 

FASHION DIRECTOR Matthew Marden 

STYLE DIRECTOR Eugene Tong 

SENIOR MARKET EDITOR Justin Berkowitz 

FASHION ASSISTANT Katelyn Cervini 


PHOTO 

SENIOR PHOTO EDITOR Stacey DeLorenzo 

CONTRIBUTING BOOKINGS EDITOR Edward Kim 


ART/PRODUCTION 

DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR Justin Patrick Long 

SENIOR DESIGNER SarahOlin 

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR William Pelkey 

SENIOR PRODUCTION MANAGER JohnMarkic 


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COPY CHIEF Clay Thurmond 

RESEARCH DIRECTOR Timothy Hodler 

SENIOR COPY EDITOR Rebecca O'Connor 

RESEARCH | ASSISTANT EDITOR Daniel Jameson 


D G TAL 


DIGITAL DIRECTOR James Oliver Cury 
SENIOR DIGITAL EDITOR 
DIGITAL STYLE EDITOR 
SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER 
DIGITAL PRODUCER 

PR ASSISTANT 

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR 


DIGITAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR JohnVorwald 

MaxBerlinger 

Justin Fenner 

Yolanda Leaney 

Kelly Bucci 

Shen Williams 

Anna Wint our 


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ADVERT S NG 


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Go Further 


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DETAILS 


: CONTRIBUTORS 



1 / Doug 
DuBois 

PHOTOGRAPHER, “THE 
EIGHT ARTISTS TO 
WATCH RIGHT NOW,” 
R86 

Behind the scenes: 

“I looked at the work 
of each artist to find 
a way into the por- 
trait. Everyone was 
quite patient and 
willing to have their 
studios invaded and 
rearranged to accom- 
modate the cameras 
and lighting gear.” 
Can’t iive without: 
“Paul Smith socks.” 
Guilty pleasure: 
“Watching episodes 
of Bob's Burgers 
while I make a salad.” 
Social-media plat- 
form: Facebook — 
facebook.com/ 
douglas.j.dubois 
Bona tides: DuBois’ 
book My Lost Day at 
Seventeen, a collec- 
tion of photographs 
about growing up in 
Ireland, will be pub- 
lished this fall. 

2 / Joe Levy 

WRITER, COVER STORY: 
“THE FIGHTER,” R 74 
Behind the scenes: 
“At dinner with Jake 
Gyllenhaal, the host- 
ess sent out vegan 
crab cakes, on the 
house. He says, 

Tve been here a 
couple times and 
she’s never been 
that nice. She must 
know you’re from a 
magazine and think 
you’re reviewing it.’ 

So if you're wonder- 
ing what I’m better at 
than Jake, it’s vegan 
crab cakes.” 

Off the clock: “I 
spend a lot of time 
at Flywheel. Jake is 
a SoulCycle guy, but 
we put those differ- 
ences aside.” 


Can’t live without: “A 

14-year-old Margiela 
motorcycle jacket.” 
Guilty pleasure: 

“The pleasure I take 
from listening to 
Nick Jonas is entirely 
guilt-free.” 
Social-media plat- 
form: Twitter — 
(Srealjoelevy 
Bona tides: Levy 
is a contributing edi- 
tor at Rolling Stone 
and host of the 
new-music audio 
show “Incoming” 
on Spotify. 

3 / Lionel 
Koretzky 

PHOTOGRAPHER, “BLUE 
IN THE FACE.” R 80 
Behind the scenes: 
“We started from 
some of Andy 
Warhol’s Polaroids. I 
tried to shoot spon- 
taneously, handheld, 
the way he would 
have. Not overthink 
each setup. Blue 
things, blue watches, 
banana, phone, lob- 
ster — ^just beautiful.” 
Can’t live without: 

“A Steven Alan shirt 
and my Stan Smith 
sneakers.” 

Hidden talent: 
“Driving fast. I used 
to race go-karts and 
rally cars, like the 
Peugeot Volant 106, 
in the mid-nineties.” 
Social-media plat- 
form: Instagram — 
lionel koretzky 
Bona fides: Koretzky 
is an associate edi- 
tor for Lollipop mag- 
azine, which covers 
Formula One racing. 
He’s shot for GQ and 
Man of the World, 
among others. 


4/ Antonina 
Jedrzejczak 

EDITOR, “THE EIGHT 
ARTISTS TO WATCH 
RIGHT NOW," R 86 
Behind the scenes: 
“It’s easy to create 
something if you’re 
only going for shook 
value. The artists in 
this story manage 
to make art that is 
wholly original but 
at the same time 
feels important and 
beautiful on a purely 
aesthetic level. That’s 
not so easy.” 

Can’t live without: “A 
gold LOVE bracelet 
from my dad — I liter- 
ally can’t take it off.” 
Go-to outfit: “The 
great fashion equal- 
izer: a white cot- 
ton button-down, 
oversize gray cash- 
mere sweaters and 
scarves, and beat-up 
denim.” 

Listening to on re- 
peat: “ ‘Waymore’s 
Blues’ by Waylon 
Jennings, Clapton’s 
version of ‘Ain’t 
Nobody’s Business,’ 
and Little Esther’s 
‘Aged and Mellow.’” 
Social-media plat- 
form: Instagram — 
antoninawiktoria 
Bona fides: 
Jedrzejczak is an 
associate editor at 
Details. 

5 / Ryan Plett 

PHOTOGRAPHER, 
“TRACK SUITS,” R 64 
Behind the scenes: 

“This shoot was 
about taking a mood 
that stemmed from 
late-seventies, early- 
eighties subway im- 
agery and combining 
the refined elements 
of the modern suit. 
We were running 
from station to sta- 
tion. I kept picturing 


08.15 


Fight Club in New 
York City.” 

Can’t live without: 
“My gold Rolex 
Datejust.” 

Hidden talent: “I 
swam in college. 

I was no Michael 
Phelps, but I got to 
eat about 5,000 calo- 
ries a day.” 
Social-media plat- 
form: Instagram — 
ryan plett 

Bona fides: Plett has 
photographed for 
GQ, Avenue, and the 
Huffington Post. 

6 / Laura Bolt 

WRITER, “A LITTLE BIT 
SOFTER NOW,” R 42 
Behind the scenes: 

“I watched a lot of 
these ASMR videos 
where people whis- 
per or record sounds 
like rustling fabric to 
help others relax, but 
it kind of had an op- 
posite effect on me. 

I think you either feel 
it or you reoHy don’t.” 
Can’t live without: 
“Vintage YSL plat- 
form heels. They are 
completely unsuit- 
able for anything but 
standing very still 
and maybe hold- 
ing a cocktail, but I 
don’t want to live in 
a world where that 
doesn’t happen at 
least once in a while.” 
Guilty pleasure: 
“Seventies giallo 
films like Suspiria — 
they hit the balance 
of style and sleaze 
that appeals to me.” 
Social-media plat- 
form: Instagram — 
la_vie_bolt 
Bona fides: Bolt Is 
an associate editor 
at Details. 


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PHOTOGRAPH: © DUCCIO M ALAGAMBA/COURTESY OF TASCHEN, 


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ImowStell the well-curated life 


a 





ARCHITECTURE 

CONCRETE 

IDEA 


FROM THE PANTHEON’S NEARLY 2,000-YEAR-OLD 

coffered dome to the floating, cantilevered ter- 
races of Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater, con- 
crete — utterly utilitarian, uniquely malleable and 
durable — has long given architects the freedom 
to experiment with form and function. It offers 
them the same flexibility today in the delicate, 
sun-soaked latticework facade of Rudy Ricciotti’s 
MuCEM in Marseille, France; in the angular heights 
of Steven Holl’s Sliced Porosity Block, a reimag- 
ining of public space in Chengdu, China; in the 


' It 


The Ibere Camargo Foundation, the Alvaro Siza- 


Zumthor’s austere Bruder Klaus Field Chapel' 
windowless sanctuary emerging unexpectedly 
from farmlands in western Germany. The new 
700 Contemporary Concrete Buildings (Taschen, 
$60), a two-volume tome that unites schematics 
and photos of the greatest modern concrete con- 
structions, features 96 other marvels, all worthy 
of representing the remnants of our civilization 
two millennia from now. — Kevin Fires 


sinuous, shore-crossing strands of Zaha Hadid's designed museum in Porto Alegre, Brazil, dedicated 


Sheikh Zayed Bridge in Abu Dhabi; and in Peter to the work of the Brazilian painter. 



DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


THE COCKTAIL HOUR 


ImowStell 


DRINKS 


HllllllllllllllllllllllllllnillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIMrilllirillllllllllllllrlllllMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIlirilllMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIII 

BY JOSHUA BERNSTEIN » PHOTOGRAPH BY JEREMY LIEBMAN 


PARTY-BOUND? BRING A BETTER BOTTLE 


BY AUGUST, THE TYPICAL GIFTS YOU’D OFFER A HOST— A DECENT 

white, a six-pack of local beer, a bottle of bubbly — are as worn out 
as that “Summer Jams” playlist. No matter what kind of shindig 
you’re headed to (rooftop drinks, a backyard barbecue, or the type 


of dinner that requires a seating chart), there’s a surprise move you 
can make to ensure that what you hand over won’t be relegated 
to the back of the fridge. Here, three new, refreshing alternatives 
that will elicit cheers from the crowd. 



What everyone else is bringing: ^ 

What everyone else is bringing: ^ 

Champagne q 

A seasonal craft ale or an ironic sixer 

What you’re bringing: ^ 

of PBR ^ 

A Prosecco Col Fondo, like O 

What you’re bringing: Pd 

Ca’ dei Zago ($20; astorwines.com) ^ 

Ca I’Arenys Guineu Riner ale ($6; ^ 

from northern Italy 

klwines.com) from Spain, which is be- Z 

Why you’re bringing it: ^ 

coming a hotbed of interesting brews P 

Ca’ dei Zago is more gently carbonated ^ 

Why you’re bringing it: ^ 

and has less alcohol than a typical y 

This unfiltered ale is light-bodied and H 

champagne. The yeast — “Col Fondo” ^ 

citrusy, with just 2.8 percent alcohol 

means “with sediment,” a reference 

by volume, so it's a beer anyone (not 

to the siltlike layer of spent yeast left 

just typically convivial Spaniards) can 

over from the bottle-conditioning 

spend an extended evening drinking. 

process — adds richness and layers 

And because it’s still, you know, beer, 

of flavor, says Patrick Cappiello, 

it pairs with everything from burgers 

who serves Ca’ dei Zago as the wine 

to chicken. 

director at New York City’s Rebelle 


and Pearl & Ash restaurants. 



What everyone else is bringing: 

A chilled Semilion 
What you’re bringing: 

A high-proof Bolivian brandy like 
Singani 63 ($29; boweryandvine.com), 
good for cocktails or as a digestif 
Why you’re bringing it: 

This unaged spirit “is more sophis- 
ticated than grappa” — it goes down 
easier — “but still has that gritty tex- 
ture,” says Devon Tarby, co-owner of 
the Normandie Club in Los Angeles. He 
uses Singani 63 — imported by Steven 
Soderbergh, who came to love it while 
filming Che — in daiquiris; It could also 
punch up mojitos or work with tonic. Or 
pour some over Ice from that bag you 
wisely thought to buy, just in case. 


20 


DETAILS AUGUST 201 5 


SET DESIGN BY KATE LANDUCCI FOR MARY HOWARD STUDIO. 



STREET 






LIVING LIKE WE’RE RENEGADES 




'l “7 

■T 

A. 


'X® 

1 ] W A 



Camera+ | 


know 8 tell 


SOCIAL MEDIA 


HiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiniiiiiiMiniMiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiitiiiM 


BECOME AN 
INSTA PRO 

IF YOU’RE GOING TO SHARE YOUR LIFE ON 

Instagram, share the best version. That means moving 
beyond using built-in filters like Valencia and X-Pro II and 
taking advantage of apps that'll bring your 'gram game 
to the next level. Not doing that yet? Don't get all dark 
and Inkwell-y on us; nobody's going to unfollow you . . . 
yet. And we're here to help: We played around with four 
of the most popular apps and even employed maga- 
zine photographer Andrew Hetherington (who shoots 
for Details) to provide a pro-level assessment. 


2 InstaSize 

► WHAT IT DOES 
InstaSize is a quick way 
to reformat pictures 
for Instagram's square 
display. It has an easy 
Collage function, too, to 
combine several snaps 
into one image, with a 
variety of layouts. 

► WHAT IT 
DOES BEST 

If you want to import 
images originally shot 
on your DSLR or other 
non-smartphone camera 
to your Insta feed, this 
app will crop the pics for 
ideal presentation. It also 
punches up everyday 
shots; a picture of a wine 
bottle, or smoked mus- 
sels, or a record player 
may not say much on its 
own — but add them to- 
gether in Collage, and it's 
clear you're at one hell of 
a party. 

► WHAT THE 
PRO SAYS 

“It's straightforward — 
you can resize with a 
pinch and swipe. The 
Collage function's fun. I'd 
pay the premium [$13] 
to ditch the ads, though.” 
(Free for iOS, Android) 



Snapseed 


► WHAT IT DOES 

One of the most popular photo apps, Snapseed isn't 
exactly user-friendly. But it rewards experimentation with 
the ability to edit photos to a higher degree of precision. 

► WHAT IT DOES BEST 

Unlike Instagram, which allows only for adjusting overall 
exposure, contrast, or other settings, Snapseed lets you 
lighten, darken, saturate, or otherwise edit specific areas 
of a shot. Using the Brush function, you can manipulate 
exposure, color temperature, saturation, etc., with a 
swipe, “painting” the effects on the original image. 

► WHAT THE PRO SAYS 

“You don't realize how to add or remove effects until you 
start sliding your finger around and the menu appears, 
and it’s 'Ahal'” (Free for iOS, Android) 





► WHAT IT DOES 

An extensive and wonky suite of tools, Camerat- 
seems designed for those who speak photog- 
raphy fluently, but its most useful features don't 
require an advanced degree. 

► WHAT IT DOES BEST 
Camera+ offers a host of ways to optimize 
common types of pictures — of food, concerts, 
sunsets, the beach, and more. Its handiest func- 
tion, however, is Clarity, which adjusts exposure, 
saturation, brightness, and other settings to make 
a photo's details pop. It works for most any image 
but is particularly well suited to architecture and 
street scenes. 

► WHAT THE PRO SAYS 
“After you make your adjustments, it’s great to tap 
the 'info' button to see all the effects you applied. 
It's like notes from the darkroom — it forces you to 
learn what works.” ($3 for iOS) 

24 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 




IT 





► WHAT IT DOES 
This editing app is good for 'grammers who want to 
re-create the feel of film photography, with filters and 
effects that echo a faded Polaroid, the gritty output of a 
disposable camera, or a dusty lens. 

► WHAT IT DOES BEST 

The “light leak” filters mimic when light used to seep 
through camera cases and overexpose parts of images. 
They're a simple way to add a touch of throwback cool, 
as long as the context makes sense (think a classic 
muscle car, a blonde in cut-off shorts, anything happen- 
ing in Los Angeles right now). Just be sure to adjust the 
effect way down; the default settings are heavy-handed. 

► WHAT THE PRO SAYS 

“If your shot reminds you of a vintage postcard, it lends 
itself to this kind of nostalgia.” ($7 for iOS, Android) 



BY MICHAEL FRANK 


PHOTOGRAPHS; COURTESY OF SARAH OLIN, 







FEE L 


! • > : 


Genuine leath^, Ceramic Craft and Metallic Craft. 
The back of the all-new IjG G4 has been fabricated 

/ “ ‘ r* * 

in three cGtting edge materials, each designed 

0 f 

with an eye towards classic craftsmanship. And 
with a 5.5'' JI?S’ Quantum QuadHD display and 
1 6 MP camera with an f/1.8 lens underneath 
it all, it performs as beautifully as it looks. 


See the Great. Feel the Great 


WWW. LG. com/G4 


Qualcomm 

02015 LG Ekclmnk's U.S.A. Iik. All rights reserved. LG and Life's Good are registered trademarks ofLGCorp. Other trademarks and trade names are propertv* of their respective owners. 
Screen images simulated. Design, interface & color options may vary depending on carrier. Qualcomm and Snapdragon are trademarks of Qualcomm Incorporated, registered in 
the United States and other countries. Used with permission. 


ImowStell 


DESIGN 


HIMIlillllilllMlllllllllinMIinillHIillHilllllllllllllNIIIMinMIllllllllMlllllllinilllllllMllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIMnitllltllllllllllllllltMlllllllinilllMlllllllllilllllllltiniltlllllllliniMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIinMIllinilllMlillMIIIMIIIIIMHI 

BY ANTONINA JEDRZEJCZAK AND JON ROTH 





a julep. Mainly, though, plants add 
warmth — and intrigue. As Eliza Blank, 
founder of the Sill, a plant purveyor in 
New York City, asks, “Don't you want 
to be this cool city dweller who has 
this great jungle in their fifth-floor 
walk-up?” (Answer: Yes, you do.) 


From left: Joey Roth Glazed Self- 
Watering Planter, $65; Revolution 
Design House Boxcar Single 
Planter, from $24; Tree Square 
Spir Planter, $745; PAD Outdoor 
Alto Planter with stand, $272; 
Livingthings Voltasol Flower Pot, 
from $53; Modernica Case Study 
Planter with stand, from $1 49. 


GREEN 

PARTY 

Give your houseplants 
some modem lodging 
and they’ll have as much 
impact on your interior 
as any accent table. With 
a slew of look-at-me 
pots ready to luxe up 
your space, it’s time you 
got growing. 


“GUYS ARE STARTING TO REALIZE 

that cold, sterile bachelor pads aren’t 
cool anymore, and a more organ- 
ic aesthetic is what it’s all about,” 
says Oakland, California, landscape 
designer Joe Cafuir. Which is why 
you can’t crack a furnishings cata- 
log today without spying a succulent: 
Long an afterthought, houseplants 
are now essential in stylish interiors, 
thanks to statement-making plant- 
ers and vibrant, graphic flora that 
breathe new life into a space long 
dominated by Aunt Sally’s hanging 
plastic fern holders. The emphasis on 
organic is a corollary to the farm-to- 
table movement — you’re not grow- 
ing heirloom tomatoes, but anyone 
can keep a mint plant to freshen up 


The Glass Is Always Greener 




Eero Table 
by Opiary, 
starting at 
$1,995 


Cactus Chair 
by Thislexik, 
$2,200 


The thought of mixing glass and dirt might conjure up 
images of Windex, but not after you see the new furniture- 
meets-garden hybrids designers are creating. Opiary’s Eero 
Table — an homage to the iconic Eero Saarinen tulip table — 
has a built-in irrigation tine that’s able to sustain a bonsai 
tree (or an arrangement of your choice), while the minimalist 
acrylic Cactus Chair lets you get comfortable doing some- 
thing your brain might naturally warn against: sitting atop a 
10-inch-tall barrel cactus, which is included. 



GROW A PAIR 

As in menswear, there are trends in 
plants. Currently, the oversize, finicky 
fiddle leaf fig tree dominates floor space 
in apartments across the country. But 
the next big (little) thing, says Tara Heibel, 
owner of Sprout Home in Chicago, is 
marimo balls: “Marimo are made of 
pure algae and get their shape by roll- 
ing around on the bottom of lake beds, 
and they make a perfect gift for those 
who have an aversion to soil. They are 
super-simple to take care of: Just keep 
the water clean and cool.” 


PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM RIGHT: COURTESY OF SPROUT HOME; COURTESY OF EACH SUPPLIER (8). 


(!bLG 


GENUINE 



SMART 




know 8 tell 


THE STARLET 


HIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinilMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIliriMlllllllllllllllllllllllinilirilllllMlllllllllllfllllllllllMIMIIIIIIIlirillllllllllllllllllinilllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

BY DAVID SWANSON 


MEET HOLLYWOOD'S NEWEST OBSESSION 



Forget superheroes, dinosaurs, and natural disasters — the year’s hottest 
movie trend is casting 26-year-old Swedish sensation Alicia Vikander. 


WHILE FILMING THIS MONTH’S BIG-SCREEN 

take on the sixties spy series The Man From 
U.N.C.L.E., Alicia Vikander was forced to face 
her greatest fear. “I'd never really done comedy 
before, and [director] Guy Ritchie would come in 
and say, ‘Now be funny,”' the Swedish actress 
explains. “I'd be standing there with my cheeks 
turning red. It was my worst nightmare to have 
someone tell me to say something funny in front 
of a rolling camera.” 

For Hollywood's newest It Girl, wf)o first 
gained notice in 201 2'sAnna Koren/na, getting 
a laugh was just another challenge in e year 


full of them. In 201 5 alone, the 26-year-old has 
already starred as a disconcertingly beautiful 
robot temptress in Ex Machina, a disconcert- 
ingly beautiful witch in Seventh Son, and a 
disconcertingly beautiful World War I nurse in 
Testament of Youth, with upcoming roles along- 
side Bradley Cooper in Adam Jones, Christoph 
Waltz in Tulip Fever, Eddie Redmayne in The 
Danish Girl, and real-life boyfriend Michael 
Fassbender in The Light Between Oceans. But 
it was the action-packed U.N.C.L.E. that gave 
Vikander her best chance to use the skills she 
developed growing up as a dancer. “It was nine 


years of physical training, and it definitely came 
in handy, because in a way, stunt scenes are all 
choreography,” she says. “I still love to go out 
and dance. That's the best way to wake me up 
in the morning. I put on music and go into the 
shower and shake my hips a bit.” 

And when it comes to music, you can take the 
girl out of Sweden, but you can't take Sweden 
out of the girl. “I went to a karaoke bar in New 
York with some friends the other day, and as 
soon as an ABBA song comes up, they hand me 
the mic. I'm like, ‘I can do other things, too!'” she 
says. “You know, I love a bit of Ace of Base.” ■ 






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DETAILS AUGUST 201 5 29 



know 8 tell 


FIVE THINGS WE EMPHATICALLY ENDORSE 




decades as head of 
the Manhattan-based 
public-art organization 
Creative Time, the 
trailblazing 50-year-old 
begins a new post in a 
new borough. 


Q: Directors often 
bring in name 
architects to increase 
their museums’ 
curb appeal. Any 
plans to do so? 

A: There’s a lot to be 
done — an endowment 
to build, expansion 
of the curatorial 
team — but bringing in 
a starchitect isn’t my 
style. My style is more 
community-oriented. 


Q: Your background is 
in contemporary art. 
How do you feei about 
working on, say, the 
Egyptian collection? 

A: Thrilled, actually. 

I love all eras of art 
from all over the 
world. It’s funny, 
people think a con- 
temporary-art person 
can’t do those things. 
Everybody has their 
areas of focus; it 


doesn’t mean they 
aren’t excited by 
world cultures and 
histories and artifacts 
and that they don’t 
rely on their experts 
to make magic hap- 
pen. Does the CEO of 
Coca-Cola know how 
to bottle? [Loughs] 

Q: You'il work 
mere steps from 
Prospect Park. Are 
you a jogger? 


A: I’m one of the 
least athletic people 
I knowl And all of the 
most successful di- 
rectors are extremely 
athletic. Glenn Lowry 
[director of the 
Museum of Modern 
Art] bikes, like, 100 
miles a morning. I'm 
thinking. My God, I’m 
going to have to get 
some sort of healthy 
routine. Yikes! 


SPAN Q&A 


Anne 
Pasternak, 
Incoming 
Director of 
the Brookiyn 
Museum 


MUSIC y 

THE RETURN OF AN INDIE-ROCK ENIGMA 

With 201 1 's Kaputt, Dan Bejar’s ninth album under the nom de rock Destroyer, the Canadian 
indie vet received the kind of acclaim every musician dreams of. So, naturally, he takes a hard 
left turn with his new release. Poison Season. Replete with strings, synths, and sax solos 
(so many sax solos). Poison Season forsakes its predecessor’s pop pleasures for something 
more baroque — which isn’t to say it’s any less listenable. The marriage of chamber pop and 
seventies-style stadium rock looks strained on paper but sounds great on tracks like “Times 
Square.” Just don’t expect more of the same on the next one. Out August 28. 


PERFORMANCE 


JASON SEGEL’S 
UNLIKELY 
TOUR DE FORCE 


As an actor whose 
career highlights have 
come sans pants 
(Forgetting Sarah 
Marshall) and opposite 
Moppets, Jason Segel 
may not have been an 


obvious choice to play 
the late Infinite Jest 
author David Foster 
Wallace in director 
James Ponsoldt's ele- 
giac drama The End of 
the Tour. Any doubts. 


however, quickly 
fade as a do-ragged 
Segel lays bare both 
bllace’s almost ag- 
gr^9il(e normalness 
and his ff&H^ltrela- 
tionshipwith hi: I own 
exceptionalism, as re- 
vealed over the lourse 
of a five-day int Irview 
with Rolling Sto |e 
reporter David L tpsky 
(Jesse Eisenber0. 
Subtly funny an I ulti- 
mately heartbre Iking, 
Segel hasn’t sh< iwn 
this much on screen 
since, well, you mow. 
Out July 3 1 . 


THE N EWLY 
TRANSLATED EARI^ 
WORKS OF HAR0KI 
MUR^AMI 


B^re this m(^h’s release of Wind/Pinball, 
nopf, $26), Jlaruki Murakami’s first two 
novellas vim nearly impossible to find in 
English. Etrly versions of the disaffected 
chain-liking narrators and Western 
pop>«ulture references that populate the 
author's later epics crop up here, 
but the volume is worth picking up for the 
introduction alone, in which Murakami 
explains how he began his career while 
running a Tokyo jazz club (writing at his 
kitchen table in the early-morning hours) 
and how he developed his deadpan, off- 
kilter style: by writing in English, then 
rewriting in Japanese. Out August 4. 


Fiberglass-reinforced piastic Fames chairs, first soid in 1950. 


DESIGN ^ 

THE CHAIRS THAT CHANGED EVERYTHING 


Husband-and-wife team Charles and Ray Kaiser Eames made immeasur- 
able contributions to 20th-century architecture, textile design, and even 
film, but their surname will forever be synonymous with their molded- 
plywood-and-leather lounge chair, a piece of furniture so iconic that it’s 
in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art. The newly updated Eames 
(Taschen, $15) offers a comprehensive look at the couple’s life’s work 
and legacy, in a downsized edition that’s striking enough to display yet 
small enough to take with you, because in industrial design (and books 
that celebrate it), form follows function. Out now. 


30 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 





PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: TIMOTHY GREENFIELD-SANDERS/COURTESY OF THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM; 
FABIOLA CAKRANZA/COURTESY OF MOTORMOUTHMEDIA; COURTESY OF PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE; COURTESY OF 
TASCHEN; )AKOB I H RE/COU RTESY OF STRATEGY PR ( 2 ). 






know 8 tell :• BODY 


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ENOUGH 
WITH THE 
RECOVERY 
FETISH 

For the ultrafit, the new boast has 
nothing to do with exercise. It’s about 
the extremes they endure to recuperate 
between gym sessions. Remember 
when working out was enough? 

BY CHRIS RAYMOND » PHOTOGRAPH BY JEREMY LIEBMAN 


EVERY SATURDAY, AETER HIS 7 A.M. CROSSFIT SESSION, JON HOFFMAN SPENDS 

two hours recovering. For most humans, this means light stretching, mayhe hrunch, 
then a whole lot of well-earned nothing. But Hoffman is not most humans. Post- 
workout, the 28-year-old goes through a succession of treatments designed to flush 
toxins from his tissues and encourage the replenishment of healing, oxygen-rich 
hlood. The procedure takes place at the Chicago Recovery Room (motto: “Train like 
a pro, recover like a pro”). First, Hoffman’s legs, hips, and upper hody are wrapped 
in compression sleeves to improve circulation. That's followed hy a series of electri- 
cal-stimulation (or “e-stim”) muscle treatments to relieve tension. Finally, there's 
a 53-degree ice hath to fight inflammation. It’s a program worthy of an NBA point 
guard or an Olympic sprinter. Hoffman? He’s an architect. And he takes his routine 
as seriously as Steph Curry or Usain Bolt might. “Recovery is more than rest,” he 
says. “It’s a constant attempt to stay ahead of the curve. You can sit on your couch 
and relax, hut it’s not going to really do anything for your hody.” 

A locker-room hrag was once about how hard you had just crushed it (think of 
Ron Burgundy as Veronica Corningstone watches him lift a weight in Anchorman: 
“Oh, I can barely lift my right arm ’cause I did so many. I don’t know if you heard 
me counting. I did over a thousand”). But Hoffman typifies a new breed of hyper- 
competitive exerciser, guys who take as much pride in how hard they recuperate 
between workouts as they do in how much they deadlift. And they’re not shy about 
sharing the lengths they go to: When you’re kneading knots in your shoulders and 
hack with a $199 Hyperice Vyper vibrating foam roller, modesty’s not really part of 
the equation. “It used to be ‘Work hard or go home,’ and whoever could go the hard- 
est won,” says Brett Klika of the Human Performance Institute in Orlando, Florida, 
who trains Olympians, college athletes, and business executives. “Now the more 
you talk about your recovery, the more serious people take you. It’s an identity: ‘Tm 
working out so hard, I need the same care pro athletes do.’ ” 

There’s more than one way to channel your inner LeBron. There are perfor- 
mance-oriented versions of old-school treatments like sports massage and chiro- 
practic adjustment, and there are more niche procedures like the soft-tissue manip- 
ulation known as Active Release Technique, or trigger-point dry-needling, in which 
a filament needle is inserted into muscle tissue to relieve tension. Then there’s the 
fun stuff— the fancy toys like NormaTec toe-to-thigh compression boots ($1,750) 


and the Marc Pro Device, an at-home mus- 
cle-stimulation unit ($650). The most ex- 
treme recovery junkies endure two or three 
minutes in a cryotherapy chamber, an eight- 
foot-tall stainless-steel cylinder filled with 
liquid nitrogen that chills the air to -256 
degrees to reduce inflammation, improve 
sleep, and ease post-workout pain. Cristiano 
Ronaldo reportedly spent $61,500 to put one 
in his mansion in Madrid. 

But that’s Ronaldo. He’s paid to score 
goals. However athletically talented these 
civilians think they are, they’re not earn- 
ing $80 million playing soccer. That’s irrel- 
evant, though. Talking about recovery is 
like talking about being a vegan or an ultra- 
marathoner: It’s about sacrificing to prove 
your dedication to a lifestyle, and there’s 
honor in sacrifice. If the pros on TV need 
to do this stuff because their livelihoods 
depend on it, there has to be some value in 
it for me, even if my livelihood depends 
only on sitting at a drafting table all day. 
Ultimately, it’s a way to get closer to fame 
and glory. If you’re not cashing Ronaldo’s 
checks, at least you can sleep as soundly as 
he must in Madrid. And it’s not like helping 
your hody heal is a bad thing. Anyone seri- 
ous about his exercise regimen will tell you 
that real recuperation isn’t about pamper- 
ing; it’s a rigorous, often painful method of 
prepping for more torture. “Without prop- 
er recovery, individuals are doing a major 
disservice to their bodies,” says Jay Cardi- 
ello, a celebrity strength-and-condition- 
ing coach who’s worked with 50 Cent and 
Ryan Seacrest. 

That’s why, before every workout, men 
like Kris Kruk foam-roll with a Vyper (and, 
on occasion, don a Hyperice back sleeve 
with a hidden ice-pack pouch to provide 
cold and compression therapy in one). “It 
really sets me apart, in terms of being able 
to stay active,” says Kruk, 32, of Los Angeles, 
who also uses resistance hands and Versa 
tubes, which allow for stretching in multi- 
ple planes at the same time. “I have friends 
who I’ll ask to go to the gym or do some- 
thing, and they’ll say, ‘Tm too sore, I can’t 
move.’ But because I have all these different 
recovery methods, I feel fine.” And so what 
if he works in TV-ad sales? ■ 


32 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 



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The temperature inside a 
cryotherapy chamber, 
like this one at KryoLife in 
New York City, plummets 
to minus 256 degrees F 
for up to three minutes. 
Enthusiasts say the 
treatment reduces inflam- 
mation, boosts immunity, 
and eases pain. 


ImowStell 


ETIQUETTE 


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BY HOWIE KAHN • PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS GORMAN 


THE NEW RULES 
OE TIPPING 


Used to be that leaving a little extra was for a 
job done well, not just a job done. But technology is 
changing how we think about saying thanks. 


MY GREAT-UNCLE LOUIE 

opened the Tropicana casino in 
Las Vegas as a pit boss in the 
fifties and, in spread coilars and 
sharkskin suits, carried a fiair for 
gratuity the rest of his iife. He 
slid waitresses cash at the begin- 
nings of meais as a heiio; once, 
he ended a dinner by walking 
into the restaurant’s kitchen and 
tucking trifoided twenties into 
the dishwashers’ shirt pockets. 
Uncle Louie aiways acted iike 
exhibiting excessive generosity 
was part of his private contract 
with the service industry. 

Fast-forward a few decades. 

I’m getting a latte, a freshly 
frothed heart quivering atop 
its surface. The barista swipes 
my AmEx, then rotates her iPad 
toward me for a finger signa- 
ture. My drink costs $4. 1 want 
to drink it, but instead I’m given 
five prompts: No tip. An amount 
of my choosing. Or, adding one, 
two, or three dollars — $3 being a 
75 percent thank-you. Now, I'm 
genetically inclined to overtip. 
(Who among us doesn’t tip in line 


with what our relatives did or to 
compensate for them?) But we’re 
talking about coffee. Until recent- 
ly, I would have left a buck and 
looked considerate for doing so. 
But now you can’t know if leaving 
paper — 25 percent — is cheap, 
standard, or makes me a mod- 
ern-day Uncle Louie. And being 
forced to ponder my private con- 
tract before I’m coherent in the 
morning isn’t exactly the prework 
ritual of my dreams. 

Tipping has always produced 
at least some anxiety in people. 
Going overboard may be as much 
about deep-seated issues as it is 
about munificence. And if you're 
giving something to the macchi- 
ato artist who pulled your shot, 
what about your tailor and dry 
cleaner? Who gets tipped? Who 
doesn't? The art of leaving a little 
extra has become so chaotic that 
blanket solutions seem appeal- 
ing. Memorably, Steve Martin’s 
character in My Blue Heaven 
simplified the process. “I tip 
everybody,” he says, greasing an 
FBI agent. Then there’s the other 


extreme: Throw up your hands 
and say fuck the whole system, 
like Steve Buscemi’s Mr. Pink in 
Reservoir Dogs. (What he actu- 
ally says is, “I don’t tip because 
society says I have to,” but, same 
thing, mostly.) Tipping, once con- 
sidered a bonus for good service, 
now just reflects the fact of the 
service, not the quality of it. 

There’s no tipping at Per Se 
in New York City and Alinea in 
Chicago — both of which can do 
what they please, like building 
service into the bill, and still 
be booked months out. “Who 
wants to add numbers and sign 
a check at the end of an amazing 
experience?" says Nick Kokonas, 
Alinea’s co-owner, who’s rolling 
out Tock, an online booking 
system that lets diners pay their 
bill, including tip, before walking 
in the door. “It doesn’t match 
up with great hospitality.” So if 
you’re trying to impress people 
you’re dining with, do you leave 
a token amount? At Alimento, an 
Italian restaurant in Los Angeles, 
there are two gratuity lines on 


bills: one for the server and one 
for the kitchen, the traditionally 
untipped workers in the back. 

Do you leave 1 0 percent for 
the server and 1 0 percent for 
the kitchen? Fifteen and five? 
Calculus makes for a shitty petit 
four. And now that we get around 
in Ubers, and there’s no tipping 
but sometimes higher fares, 
what's cool in a taxi? Twenty per- 
cent seems high considering the 
level of service, but it’s the low- 
est prompt you’ll see paying by 
card in New York City, and who 
has the time or sobriety to figure 
out 15 percent? 

Venture capitalists are trying 
to answer these questions for 
us in an effort to codify what 
was once an exercise in free 
will. And maybe, even, with good 
intentions: Tipping forces us to 
acknowledge that someone is 
hard at work and should be able 
to earn a living. “People’s gifts 
respond to what they perceive is 
appropriate, and that depends on 
what they are told is appropriate,” 
says Judd Kessler, CONTINUED -> 



34 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


SET DESIGN BY KATE LANDUCCI FOR MARY HOWARD STUDIO. 




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CONTINUED 

an assistant professor at the 
Wharton School of the University 
of Pennsylvania, whose research 
is focused on giving (and whose 
brother has a start-up called 
Dipjar, which replaces old-school 
tip jars with an electronic device 
preset to take gratuities from 
plastic). But automating the pro- 
cess can suck the joy out of it. 
Uncle Louie would’ve hated this. 

No matter how hard Silicon 
Valley strives to stamp its boiler- 
plate ethos of making the world 
a better place onto the tipping 
economy, you can’t tip every 
worker in the house individually 
on a tablet. Square, which allows 
just about anyone with a smart- 
phone to be a personal point-of- 
sale terminal, doesn’t have an 
algorithm for bailers. Nor does 
an app like Tip.ly — “Tip anyone, 
anywhere simply by taking a pic- 
ture of their smiling face’’ — or a 
service like ChangeTip, which lets 
you send Bitcoins via Facebook 
and Twitter. There’s also the nag 
factor. I’d like to think that these 
electronic prompts target con- 
sumers who were too cheap to tip 
properly in the first place — like 
any number of Internet-shamed 
losers tried and convicted by 
the court of public opinion. (Take 
LeSean McCoy, who, as a mem- 
ber of the Philadelphia Eagles 
earning more than $7.6 million 
last year, left a waiter 20 cents.) 
Tight asses could certainly use 
more than a nudge to do the right 
thing. But because these prompts 
are nondiscriminatory, they deliv- 
er a virtual wrist slap to those of 
us who are skilled at spreading 
the wealth to begin with. 

Like the Chairman of the Board. 
There’s a famous Frank Sinatra 
story in which the star hands 
a parking attendant two hun- 
dred-dollar bills and asks, after 
the attendant thanks him, if it was 
the biggest tip he ever got. “Well, 
no, sir,” the valet says — to which 
Sinatra replies, “What the? Who 
the hell gave you more than that?” 
The attendant says, “Why, you did, 
Mr. Sinatra. Last week!” Imagine 
that going down on an iPad. ■ 



CULTURAL DIET 


JASON ISBELL 

AFTER EARNING HIS REPUTATION AS A WORLD- 
class songwriter, first as a member of the south- 
ern-rock outfit Drive-By Truckers and iater as a 
soio artist, Jason isbell raised the iyrical stakes 
with 201 3’s Southeastern, an intenseiy personal 
aibum (author Walter Kirn said it evoked the 
meiancholy of Flannery O’Connor and Raymond 
Carver) that ied the 36-year-oid Alabama native 
to a sweep of the Americana Honors & Awards. 
His recently released foilow-up. Something 
More Than Free, again confirms that isbeil takes 
his storyteiiing seriously — not unlike his Netflix 
and corn-bread consumption. — David Waiters 


RAP GENIUS 

“Outkast’s Aquemini 
[ 1 ] destroyed me. 

It’s melodic, there’s 
attitude, and there’s 
something about the 
way Big Boi and Dre 
deal with issues of 
family and kids and 
having to be grown 
men. If all bets were 


off, I would not mind 
making the kind of 
music they make, 
but I’m not qualified 
to do that. Though, 
you know, we’re 
all qualified to talk 
about what it’s like 
to be a man tryin’ 
to straighten up and 
fly right.” 


FRESH FLICKS 

“I use Rotten Toma- 
toes’ Netflix search 
algorithm. Not ev- 
eryone knows about 
it, but it saves so 
much time. The last 
thing I found was a 
Werner Herzog [2] 
documentary called 
Happy People: A 
Year in the Taiga, 
about fur trappers 
in Siberia. One guy 
gets dropped off 
with a dog and a 
chain saw, working 
a government job 
for the Soviet Union. 
He’s out there for, 
like, 20 years, but 
this son of a bitch 
is so tough, he just 
makes it work!” 

ALL THE PRETTY 
NOVELS 

“Next up is Blood 
Meridian. I’ve read 
Cormac McCarthy’s 
other books. I really 
liked his Border 
Trilogy, but I hear 
this one is the best. 

It comes down to 
the craft of the 
author: Can I picture 
myself in the room? 
Can I smell the food 
or feel the blood 
from the knife fight? 
Do I feel desperate? 
Anybody who’s really 
good at it puts you 
in the situation.” 


THE BEAT GOES ON 

“I love watching 
drum solos on You- 
Tube. There’s this 
kid, Avery Molek, 
who’s just a freak 
of nature. He has 
to wear big head- 
phones that make 
him look like he’s 
landing a plane 
because he’s so 
little that his ears 
can’t handle what 
he’s doing. And 
[session drummer] 
Bernard Purdie’s 
videos are hilarious. 
He’ll explain how he 
invented a specific 
kind of shuffle that 
nobody else can do 
as well as Bernard 
Purdie. He’s one 
of those guys who 
has no qualms with 
speaking of himself 
in the third person.” 

EMOTIONAL 

EATING 

“Husk [3] is a 
favorite restaurant. 
Sean Brock’s a 
friend — he cooked 
at my wedding. His 
corn bread is the 
best. He serves it in 
the skillet he cooks 
it in, with the bits of 
bacon. My grand- 
mother made it just 
like that — it really 
makes me want 
to cry.” 



36 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP; GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF HUSK NASHVILLE; GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF EPIC RECORDS. 







Luvo 

Be good to you. 

KALE R I COTTA 
RAVIOLI 

WITH FIRE ROASTED 
TOMATO SAUCE 


I NO AOOID SUCAR 


of sodium 
Vegetarian 
1/2 cup of vegetables 





#GetFresh in the Freezer aisle. 

Meet the hottest thing in fresh-frozen cuisine, luvolnc.com/wheretobuy 


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FOOD 


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THE “IT” DISH DECONSTRUCTED 


HATTIE B'S HOT CHICKEN 

Nashville hot chicken is everywhere (Boston, Los Angeles, even Melbourne, Australia). 
But back in Tennessee, chef John Lasater’s version is so popular the restaurant had to 
expand to handle demand. Here’s how he delivers that crispy, spicy goodness. 


“I STARTED DATING BRITTANY BISHOP 

about a year before Hattie B's opened. Her dad, 
[co-owner] Nick Bishop Sr., made me cook for him 
on his birthday, and he loved everything I made. 
We’d all grown up eating hot chicken — it wasn’t 
the thing it is today. Not a lot of people had the 
balls to go into East Nashville to get Prince’s hot 
chicken, but we did. Nick was like, ‘Man, how about 
you help us create a spice blend for Hattie B’s?’ 

“I was classically trained up in New York, but 
I have a lot of experience making barbecue 
rubs, spice rubs, blends. I worked on the dry 
rub — the basics we use are cayenne, brown 
sugar, paprika, chili powder, garlic powder, 
salt, and pepper — for six months. We have 
five heat levels, from none to incredibly spicy: 


Southern, Mild or Medium, Hot!, Damn Hot, and 
Shut the Cluck UplI! Consistency was import- 
ant: Sometimes you go to these places and 
the chicken is hot — sometimes it's so freaking 
hot it’s painful. 

“We can have heat that’ll just blow your head 
off, but I want the flavor to be there as well. I 
love spicy stuff — don’t get me wrong. I can go 
all the way up to Damn Hot, but I don’t touch 
Shut the Cluck Up!!! But some people, theyjust 
want their head blown off. 

“The chicken marinates in buttermilk, hot 
sauce, smashed garlic, thyme, and hot pep- 
pers for the spicier levels for up to 48 hours. 
The peppers in the marinade start to get a lot 
hotter as the heat level goes up — we use a 


combination of habanero, ghost peppers, and 
scorpion peppers. Then we do a double dredge 
in seasoned flour and a buttermilk-hot-sauce 
mix before frying it in soybean oil. A neutral oil 
lets all those spices in your rub shine through. 

“After the fry, you have the wet application. 
I take some soybean oil from the fryer, get it 
really hot, and add the dry rub into that fat. The 
heat activates all the spices. You want it hot 
enough that when you baste it over the fried 
chicken, the skin stays nice and crispy. 

“You see every walk of life in line at Hattie 
B’s, from somebody selling newspapers on 
the side of the road to a neurosurgeon from 
Vanderbilt. It’s about as southern as it gets. Just 
a really fun atmosphere. And we got beer.’’ ■ 



38 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


AS TOLD TO MATT DUCKOR • PHOTOGRAPH BY LIZ LIGON 


N S I D E R // 



FOLLOW 


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in life. They travel to the known and unknown, and take an 
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AT 62, THE ETERNALLY 
SUAVE PIERCE BROSNAN 
HAS DONE THINGS 
OTHER ACTORS COULD 
ONLY DREAM ABOUT 
LIKE PLAYING BOND, 
SAYING “NO THANKS” TO 
BATMAN, AND LAYING 
OFF THE BOTOX. 


INTERVIEW BY DAVID HOCHMAN 


0: The poster forpour new action-thriller. 

No Escape, features a familiar image of you, 
pistol in hand. Are you a gun owner? 

A: I have never owned a weapon, but some- 
body gave me one recently. He said I should 
have one. But it feels ugly. I really don’t like 
to have it in the house. It’s just a regular 
handgun, but it’s powerful. It’ll split you in 
two. I’ve put it aside and shall give it back. 

0: Your Malibu home nearly burned down 
lust February. What didpou lose in the fire? 

A: I had just done a week of meditation 
classes, so I was in this Zen zone of re- 
flection when the shit hit the proverbial 
fan. There were paintings, first-edition 
books— James Joyce’s Ulysses— the Aston 
Martin. I looked into the garage, and the 
car cover was engulfed in flames. In that 
nanosecond, you think, Do I try to save 
it? But it’s a car. You take the blow and 
move on, give thanks you’re alive. 

0: Has striking a work-life balance ever been 
difficult foryou? 

A: There was a time after I lost my [first] 
wife, Cassie, [to ovarian cancer] when it was 
extremely difficult. Everything was rattling 
in the realm of grief, and I was trying to 
find myself again and had to go to work 
and take my son on the road with me. It’s 
not good terrain for any young person. But 
I had the good fortune of meeting a great 
woman in Keely. We’ve been together 21 
years. We’ve created a new life and family. 

0: Your 18 -year-old son, Dylan, is now a model. 

Is the family ready for another sex symbol ? 

A: Do what makes you happy is how I see 


it— it will bring dividends. Dylan was dis- 
covered in Malibu by Hedi Slimane for Yves 
Saint Laurent while having a cup of coffee. 
This dude came by, took a photograph, and 
gave Dylan his card. He promptly lost it. 

The office called a couple weeks later, say- 
ing, “We’ve been waiting to hear from you.” 

0: Good^enes. You were a tall kid, wercn’tpou? 

A: I was six feet tall at 11 . 1 remember notic- 
ing that a lot of actors who were extremely 
powerful were a certain height, and I used 
to wish that I were maybe just half a foot 
shorter, so that I’d be more talented. More 
intensity to my mass, as it were. Foolish 
thinking as a very young actor. 

0: Your path to fame was pretty breezy. Is it true 
Remington Steele waspour Jirst audition? 

A: Yes, it was. [laughs] I didn’t struggle. 

The luck of the Irish. 

0: Andpou turned down Batman. 

A: It was the beginning of these huge mov- 
ies, and I just thought, Batman? Batman 
held such an indelible place in my own 
childhood, but I said something flippant 
to Tim Burton like, “Any guy who wears his 
underpants outside his trousers cannot be 
taken seriously.” So, yeah. 

0: Anyone you'd still love to work with.? 

A: I’ve always admired Robert De Niro. I 
met him briefly decades ago at a Night of 100 
Stars. I went up to commit my greatest ad- 
miration, and he was talking to some punk 
chick. He said, “Meet Sally,” and walked 
away. So I was stuck with some girl called 
Sally, who I had no interest in whatsoever. 


0: Yougrew up outside of Dublin. Didpou see 
legalized gay marriage coming? 

A; I never thought in a million years, but 
hallelujah! Enough of the shaming. It’s a 
great indication of the forward-thinking of a 
nation that’s been so mangled by religion. 

0: Canpou picture agay 007.? 

A; Sure. Why not? [Pauses thoughtfully] Ac- 
tually, I don’t know how it would work. I 
don’t think Barbara [Broccoli, the James 
Bond producer] would allow a gay Bond 
to happen in her lifetime. But it would cer- 
tainly make for interesting viewing. Let’s 
start with a great black actor being James 
Bond. Idris Elba certainly has the physical- 
ity, the charisma, the presence. But I think 
Daniel [Craig] will be there for a while yet. 

0: Is it fanny at 62 years old to see paparazzi 
shots of yourself on a beach in Hawaii with— 

A: With my Irish gut? [Laughs] We ran away 
to that wee island 15 years ago, and it was 
so delightful. The intrusion now is shock- 
ing, but what are you going to do? The lads 
in the hood know they can make a buck or 
two if they take a picture of Brosnan with 
his belly hanging out, looking like an old 
fart staggering out of the ocean. 

0: You’re aging well. Wouldyou ever consider 
Botox or other cosmetic procedures? 

A: Good heavens, no. It’s a disgusting thing 
in our society, what we do to ourselves. We 
should just enjoy as best we can and make 
peace. If something crashed in around the 
old face, then I suppose I’d do something— 
I have a healthy dose of vanity— but this is 
it. Long may it last. ■ 


40 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


PHOTOGRAPH; ERIC RAY DAVIDSON/TRUNKARCHIVE.COM. 




''//Mil''' 


know 8 tell 


TECH 


HIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIInillllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiniNIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIMIIIIIMIIIMlirillllllMIIIMIrlllllMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMirillllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinill 

BY LAURA BOLT • PHOTOGRAPH BY ADAM VOORHES 


A LITTLE BIT SOFTER NOW 

An offbeat genre of video is blowing up YouTube — not with a bang but with a whisper. Fans of 
autonomous sensory meridian response (yeah, it’s a mouthful) get a thrill watching gentle, repetitive 
actions like eating, ironing, and shaving. Sound weird? It is. It’s also pretty addictive. 


V* ^ 

'f/ ^ 


HAVE YOU EVER FELT A PLEASURABLE TINGLE DOWN 

your spine from hearing a whisper or sounds like tapping 
or blowing? It's okay — you’re not alone. There are now more 
than a million YouTube clips that exist to trigger this reaction, 
which was once described as goose bumps or the chills 
but today goes by the wonky term “autonomous sensory 
meridian response.” Though ASMR videos might seem like 
part of some niche sexual fetish, they’re viewed for much 
less salacious purposes, like decreasing stress and curing 
insomnia (think of them as lullabies for adults). 

It’s hard to imagine that watching a recording of a 
role-playing “ASIVIR-tist” whisper her way through a hotel 
check-in could lower blood pressure, but it might: Psychol- 
ogists at Swansea University in Wales recently conducted 
a study in which 80 percent of participants said ASMR had 
a positive effect on their mood; the researchers concluded 
that ASMR was responsible for “temporary improvements 
in symptoms of depression and chronic pain.” And while it’s 
also hard to imagine that these movies would be addictive, 
they are — as transfixing as staring into a flame. 

If you’re going to dive down this rabbit hole, you might 
as well nod off to someone murmuring about a topic that 
you like. Here’s a guide to some of the dreamiest stars of 
ASMR in style, grooming, and food and drink. 


The ASMR-tist 

Maria — she’s big enough 
in this world to get the Ma- 
donna treatment — counts 
over 430,000 subscribers 
to her “GentleWhispering” 
channel, on which she's 
known for directly address- 
ing viewers. 

The one to watch 

In Maria’s “Gentlemen’s 
Suit Fitting Session,” she 
displays fabric swatches, 
cuts patterns, and offers 
hushed style advice (e.g., 
“The tailored fit is usually 
best for any body type, 
especially muscular and 
athletic, the build that you 
have”). The 45-minute ses- 
sion has racked up more 
than 3.5 million hits. 

The sounds 

Fingers stroking fabric, 
clothes being smoothed, 
patterns being marked, 
magazines rustling. 


The ASMR-tist 

ASMR Barber’s videos fea- 
ture grooming and relax- 
ation rituals from around 
the world (the hot-towel 
service found in Italian 
barbershops, Chinese leg 
and foot massages), and 
many of them have been 
seen hundreds of thou- 
sands of times. 

The one to watch 

In “Turkish barber shave 
and haircut straight razor 
and fire” — okay, not the 
catchiest title — ASMR 
Barber sits through the 
Turkish practice of using a 
flame to singe off ear hair. 
(It’s much gentler than It 
sounds.) 

The sounds 

Scissors snipping, spray 
bottles spraying, clippers 
whirring, razors brushing 
over skin, ambient barber- 
shop noise. 


THE O.G/S OF ASMR 

BOB ROSS 

on PBS from 1983 

T.M. LEWIN 

shows you how to 

four-minute video 

Sometimes re- 

to 1 994, are full of 

In the British shirt- 

do exactly that — 

has been viewed 

Thanks to their naturally laid-back 

ferred to as the 

triggers like brush- 

maker's 2010 “How 

spraying the shirts 

more than 1.5 mil- 

style, some people are huge in the 

Godfather of ASMR, 

strokes — and fa- 

to Iron a Shirt” 

with water, manip- 

lion times. 

ASMR community even though 

the bushy-haired 

mous incantations 

video, narrator 

ulating them on the 


they never intended to be. Consider 

Joy of Pointing art- 

like “Right up in 

and T.M. Lewin 

ironing board, then 

HAIYING YANG 

these three personalities gateway 

ist’s instructional 

here, we’ll make a 

creative director 

running the iron 

The Chinese 

drugs to the movement. 

videos, which aired 

happy little cloud.” 

John Francomb 

over the fabric. The 

blogger began 





The ASMR-tist 

The eclectic Ephemeral Rift 
plays with (and sometimes 
eats) everything from pine- 
apples to pizza to Reese's 
Pieces. But he’s also known 
for his “ASMR & Beer” se- 
ries, in which he whispers 
reviews of craft brews 
(“It’s got a really nice color 
to it — amber, beautiful 
color. It’s got a nice foamy 
head there”) to his 1 33,000 
subscribers. 

The one to watch 

His take on Blue Point 
Brewing Company’s Blue- 
berry Ale also includes a 
demonstration of “binau- 
ral” audio recording, the 
technique that gives some 
ASIVIR videos a lifelike, sur- 
round-sound quality. 

The sounds 

Fingers drumming glass, 
bottle caps scratching sur- 
faces, beer being poured. 


uploading videos of 
herself doing everyday 
things like watercolor 
painting and preparing 
green tea — calming 
when ceramics clink 
and hot water is 
poured — in 2007. 


lllllllllll■IIIIII^IIIIIIIIIIIIHilllllllllllllllllllJIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIJIIMIIIIJIIIIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIMnllllllMIIMII 



know Stella Whe edit 

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PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS GORMAN 



1 . Riffe International Padauk #2 speargun, $405 2 . Art to Media diving map of Florida Keys 
shipwrecks, $1 2 3 . TankH20 water bottle, $22 4 . Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra James Bond 
watch, $7,350 5 . Van Halen, Diver Down, $12 6 . Tilos Single Lens Panoramic SG mask, $71 
7 . Aqua Lung Argonaut Ti Blunt Tip knife, $200 8 . Matuse Philo 1-mm wet-suit top, $140 
9 . Suunto EON Steel dive computer (for gauging depth, dive time, etc.), $1,440 10 . Faherty 
classic board shorts, $125 11. Art to Media Florida and Caribbean fish-spotting guide, $9 
12 . BOB Adventure shark repellent, $19 13 . Ikelite underwater housing for Panasonic Lumix 
TS6 camera, $260; TS6, $300 14 . HOG Basic Wetnotes, $15 15 . Nautilus LifeLine marine- 
rescue device, $299 16 . Bag Balm, $10 17 . Jows Blu-ray, $20 18 . Force Fin Pro swim fins, $290 


THE 

DIVER 


A thin 

layer of this 
lubricating 
salve helps 
you slip into 
a skintight 
suit, and its 
lanolin base 
keeps it from 
drying out 
your skin. 


Tear (or frantically rip) open this foil bag to release 
black dye. The cloud hides you from anything that 
might want to eat you. 


GO TO OETAILS.COM TO SHOP THIS PAGE 


PROP STYLING BY LEIGH GILL. 





PROMOTION 



FOLLOW UJ ON TWITTER: @NEWYORRERFETT 


SPONSORED BY 


® 

ACURA 


UNITED 



AUTOGRAPH 

COLLECTION* 


HOTELS 


illustration by carl DE TORRES 




PROMOTION 









VWKi 



LIFE 

S T Y L 


AN INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY OF MEN'S 
STYLE WRITERS ANO PHOTOGRAPHERS 


STYLE 

SYNDICATE 





PHOTOGRAPH BY NICHOLAS PRAKAS 


A Bigger, Better Tote 


The problem with-totes is that they’re liable to be called that most 
vicious of bag names: the M-word (rhymes with purse). But the new 
versions — like those by Hermes and Bally — cannot be confused with 
something your girlfriend would carry. They’re oversize, with short han- 
dles meant to be gripped, not slung over your shoulder, and minimally 
adorned: Burberry’s burgundy rendition, shown here, has no extraneous 
detailing, and the hardware is hidden. It’s roomy enough to hold every- 
thing you could want to throw in it. Turn the page for some suggestions. 


Bag ($2,995) by Burberry Prorsum. 

Jacket ($750) by Lardini. T-shirt ($38) 
by Apolis. Jeans ($680) by Tom Ford. 
Sneakers ($65) by Adidas Originals. 
Socks ($4) by Uniqlo. 


The Stylish 
^^fen’s Fall 
^ Cheat Sheet 

* —TJ 

j ~ know what you’re 
thinking: It’s hot out, and 
we’re talking about camel 
beanies, graphic-print 
knitwear, and sweater 
vests (yes, sweater vests)? 

Trust us: It’ll get colder 
before you know it, and 
^you’ll want to be prepared 
— with what to wear, 
s.well as what to see 
uy Ritchie’s stylish spy 
v^riller, the Kills back on 
tour). Here, 15 essentials 
for starting the season 
Br like someone whoj^ve. it 

I some forethdogh-tt^lS?^' 


L 






style fashion forwafd 


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CHEAT SHEET 


linilllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIMMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMII 



1 / 

Bottega Veneta 

($3,750) 


2 / 

Michael Kors 

($595) 


500) 

and pants ($1 ,690) 

by Salvatore 
Ferragamo. 

Sweater ($295) 

by Steven Alan. 

Sneakers ($495) 

by Bally. 

4 / 

Bally ($395) 
5 / 

Prada ($4,240) 


6/ 

Brooks Brothers 

($398) 


Camel 

Comes Back 


You’ve committeid to a camel overcoat. Which 
is goo(d. But that doesn’t mean this perfect fall 
neutral can’t pop up elsewhere in your wardrobe 
(though maybe not all at once), like it’s doing 
now with suits, sweaters, and accessories. 


48 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


PHOTOGRAPH BY NICHOLAS PRAKAS 


STYLING BY EUGENE TONG, GROOMING BY ANDREW FITZSIMONS AT ABTP.COM, CASTING BY EDWARD KIM AT THE EDIT 
DESK. STILLS BY BEN ALSOP, STYLING BY BETTINA BUDEWIG. 


PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT; COURTESY OF MANUFACTURERS {3); 
GETTY IMAGES; CORBIS; COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. (3). 



illllllllllllllllNllllllllltMIIMIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIinilMnillllllllllllllMIIIIIIIMIIIKIIIIIiniHllllllllllllMI 




Clean 

Sweep 


When it comes down to it, a significant other 
wants you to smeii ciean. Three new scents wiii 
do just that. Creed’s Royai Mayfair, Michaei Kors’ 
Extreme Biue, and Zegna’s Acqua di Bergamotto 
aii have that fresh-from-the-shower smeii, com- 
bining citrusy and woodsy notes. Zegna went with 
rosemary, whiie Kors and Creed feature Juniper, 
striking a baiance that steers ciear of Pine-Soi. 





CREED 

ROYAL MAYFAIR. $475 


MICHAEL KORS ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA 

EXTREME GLUE. $78 ACQUA 01 RERGAMOTTO. $110 


The Chicest Movie 
of the Season 


Guy Ritchie’s The Man From U.N.C.L.E. 
is an homage to the sixties spy 
series and stars Armie Hammer (as 
KGB operative iiiya Kuryakin), Henry 
Caviii (as CiA agent Napoieon Soio) — 
and the best-iooking costumes to 
hit movie screens this year. Out this 
month, the fiim foiiows the odd cou- 
pie across Europe during the height 
of sixties giamour. “You’re deaiing 
with spy stories, so it’s sexy,” says 
costume designer Joanna Johnston, 
“i was iooking at men from that 
time — Steve McQueen, Aiain Deion, 
Sean Connery. Briiiiantiy cooi, sexy 
beasts in very nice ciothes.” 

That meant putting the two 
ieads in very nice ciothes too. 
Johnston iooked to McQueen circa 
The Thomas Crown Affair for Caviii 
and to Jean-Paui Beimondo in 
Breathless for Hammer. “Henry's 
character has his suits made on 
Saviie Row, so i worked with the 
taiior Timothy Everest,” Johnston 
says. “[Napoieon’s] got shoes from 
Crockett & Jones, bespoke shirts. 
He’s a man who’s aware of his styie.” 
She adds: “Armie piays a Soviet spy, 
but i didn’t reaiiy dress him as a 
Russian.” Hammer’s signature piece 
in the fiim is a brown suede Jacket 
from Raiph Lauren, the oniy item 
that wasn’t bespoke. “We needed 
hundreds of them,” Johnston says. 
Hundreds? “Yeah, it’s because of the 
stunts in action fiims. I’m really sur- 
prised when I can use Just one.” 




From top: Armie Hammer 
(left) as Ulya Kuryakin 
and Henry Caviii as 
Napoleon Solo; Joanna 
Johnston's sketches of 
the looks. 


o 

The Two Most 
Fashionable 
Musicians Touring 
This Fall 

In the coming months, two of 
music’s best-dressed perform- 
ers are swinging through North 
America. They’re both from 
Europe, but that’s where the 
similarities end. 

THE MAN Jamie Hince 
THE TOUR July 25-September 27 
THE SOUND For more than a 
decade, Hince has been making 
an unholy racket as part of the 
London-based garage-punk duo 
the Kills. He and singer Alison 
Mosshart are back in the United 
States, playing a series of con- 
certs four years after they last 
released an album. 

THE STYLE Hince is known for his 
classic rocker look — ankle boots, 
skinny Jeans, perfectly distressed 




leather Jackets — and for his front- 
row perch at runway shows beside 
wife Kate Moss. 

THE MAN Stromae 
THE TOUR July 5-October 1 
THE SOUND The Belgian hip-hop 
dance sensation — he's crazy- 
huge on the Continent — has a 
moody, articulate take on EDM. 
This fall he headlines Madison 
Square Garden. 

THE STYLE Stromae tends toward 
the bright, geometrically patterned 
offerings from his fashion label, 
Mosaert. (That’s an anagram of 
Stromae — which is, in turn, an 
anagram of maestro. We await his 
inevitable fragrance, Samerot.) 

Above: Stromae performs in 
Milan in 2014. Left: Hince outside 
an English pub. 





CHEAT SHEET 


IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIinillllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIUMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

PHOTOGRAPH BY BEN ALSOP 



t Any Gum? 

I s(TteH=^\A/ftTfthat 
<, natural-colored 
ler — were popular 
e seventies, and 
're back now to 
you keep your " 
jker game^weet. 


Article Number 

($180) 


Vans ($55) 


Oliver Spencer 

($288) 


Hundred ($340) 


Common Projects 

■- ($442) 


Tomas Maier ($480) 


50 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


STYLING BY BETTINA BUDEWIG. 


STYLING BY EUGENE TONG. GROOMING BY ANDREW FITZSIMONS AT ABTP.COM, CASTING BY 
EDWARD KIM AT THE EDIT DESK. PHOTOGRAPHS, BOTTOM LEFT, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT; 
EVERETT COLLECTION {2); GETTY IMAGES; THE KOBAL COLLECTION. 


iiHiiiiiiiiniiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiniMiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiuiiiiMiiiMiiiniiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiMiiiiiiiiiMi 



Color 

Correct 

If you think that bright, multi- 
hued socks peeking out from 
under your suit pants counts 
as a daring pop of color, you’d 
be right — if this were 2010. 

Now it’s all about going bigger 
and bolder. Try can’t-miss-’em 
purple corduroys or layer with 
a lightweight V-neck in canary 
yellow or a scarf in kelly green. 
The key to avoiding a cartoonish 
look is to pair a single standout 
piece with a neutral palette of 
charcoals and dark blues — not 
black, which can make the 
contrast feel too eighties. And 
in case there’s any confusion 
about what’s considered auda- 
cious these days, go open a box 
of Froot Loops. 



1/ 

Blazer ($1 ,095) by 
Boglioli. Sweater 
($910) by Louis 
Vuitton. Pants ($540) 

by Bottega Veneta. 
Sneakers ($595) by 

Saint Laurent by 
Hedi Siimane. 

2/ 

Coat ($2,690) by Marc 
Jacobs. Sweater 
($1,410) byjil 
Sander. T-shirt ($300) 
by Sunspei. Pants 
($245) by Z Zegna. 
Shoes ($1,905) by 
John Lobb. 

3 / 

Suit ($6,450) and 
shoes ($1,125) by 
Hermes. Sweater 
($265) by Theory. 
Scarf ($295) by 
Margaret Howell. 



Vested 

Interest 


For decades, the sweater vest has acted as sartorial shorthand 
for “Poindexter," but labels like E. Tautz, Orley, and Saint Laurent 
are making a strong case for its revival. If you pick one up, make 
it solid (stripes, argyle, and Fair Isle patterns tend toward the 
professorial). Keep the look clean and minimal, so you come off 
more Eastwood and Brando, less Cunningham and Kotter. 




Vest ($350) by E. Tautz. Shirt ($145) by Alex Mill. Pants ($3,145 for full suit) 

by Maison Margiela. 


PHOTOGRAPHS BY NICHOLAS PRAKAS 


DETAILS AUGUST 201 5 51 




CHEAT SHEET 


Style :• 

HillMHIIIIIIIMlilllHIIMMIIMIIIIIIIIIMlIIIIHIIMlinilllMIIIIIHHIIIIIMUIIIIIIIIinilMlIHIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIiniilllllillllliinilllllllinilllllllllllMlllllinillllllllllUIIIMIIIIil 



FORWARD THINKING: 

The Hairstyle 
of the 
Moment 


Call them bangs, man- 
bangs, even he-bangs, but 
don’t let semantics bog 
you down: They make for 
a timeless, easy haircut 
that feels cool and relaxed 
after years of pomade, 
hard parts, and Boardwalk 
Empire undercuts — which 
is why the styie domi- 
nated runways at fali/ 
winter shows from Saint 
Laurent, Louis Vuitton, 
and Hermes. For the 
perfect tousled, pushed- 
forward look, keep the 
sides and back short (not 
buzzed) and let the hair 
in front stop around your 
eyebrows. Just be sure 
the whole thing comes 
off a little windswept; you 
want to shield yourself 
from comparisons to a 
young Bieber. 

Runway looks from Hermes 
(top) and Saint Laurent. 


Things 
Are Getting 
Graphic 


There are a lot of ways a sweater can make a statement — think slouchy 
cardigans or the ugly holiday-party variety (okay, forget about that one 
until December). Now there's another way. The one piece that every fash- 
ion house from Valentino to Public School sent down the fall/winter run- 
ways was a knit inspired by graphic art. Christopher Kane’s cubic take was 
reminiscent of M.C. Escher lithographs, while Bottega Veneta’s geometric 
iterations showcased a medley of triangles and stripes. What makes these 
work is the balance between an intrepid pattern and a classic crewneck 
cut. But anchor them with a white oxford and solid pants — otherwise, 
you’ll be verging into Magic Eye territory. 


Bottega Veneta Brioni ($ 1 , 300 ) Public School Valentino Christopher Paul Smith 

($ 1 , 900 ) ($ 425 ) ($ 1 , 350 ) Kane ($ 870 ) ($ 570 ) 


PHOTOGRAPH BY BEN ALSOP 


STYLING BY BETTINA BUDEWIG. RUNWAY IMAGES: COURTESY OF DESIGNERS. 


yCa>& 'JP/t/i/t'e' ^a/h&l 

BODY WASH 


U>\iJ2evev' 


■c- 




ISLAND 

BODY WASH 

AH IHViSOIMtrMM 'HAOHANC 


NIGHT 

BODY WASH 

AH IMVieOHAT>- r«A«aANCI 


FOREST 

BODY WASH 


THE FRESHEST 
START 


THE FRESHEST 

start 


THE FRESHEST 
START 


FOR A FRESH, INVIGORATING CLEAN 


CHEAT SHEET 


Style :• 

niiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMniiiiiiiiiniiiinniiiiiiinininiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiMiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiMinMiiiiniiiiiiiMiiiiuiiiniiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiuiiMiiiiMiiHMiiiniiiiMiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMiHMiiiiiiiiHiiiiiMiiiniiiiMnii^ 



PLEATED 

Pants ($1 ,535) by Berluti. Shirt ($275) 

by Officine Generals. Shoes ($440) by 
Grenson. Socks ($4) by Uniqlo. 



JOGGER 

Pants ($2,500) by Hermes. Shirt ($135) 

by Club Monaco. T-shirt ($58) by Unis. 
Shoes ($1 60) by New Balance. 


WIDE-LEG 

Pants ($760) by Gucci. Sweater 
($750) by Massimo Alba. Shoes 
($525) by Pierre Hardy. 


,, , Hitting Beiow 
’ the Beit 



Once the silent soldiers of your wardrobe, pants have been 
reborn in a seemingly endless number of styles. (You still put 
them on one leg at a time, though.) 





SKiNNY 

Pants ($575) by Caivin Kiein 
Coiiection. Polo ($345) by Orley. 
Shoes ($725) by Lanvin. 


CARGO 

Pants ($735) by Dries Van Noten. 
Sweater ($315) by Tomas Maier. 
Shoes ($75) by Adidas Originals. 


CROPPED DROP-CROTCH 

Pants ($390) by AMI. T-shirt ($275) 
by Public School. Sneakers ($55) by 
Converse. Socks ($4) by Uniqlo. 


54 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


PHOTOGRAPHS BY NICHOLAS PRAKAS 


STYLING BY EUGENE TONG. GROOMING BY ANDREW FITZSIMONS AT ABTP.COM. CASTING BY EDWARD KIM AT THE EDIT DESK. 


PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: FROM THE PIRELLI CALENDAR, 1984 BY UWE OMMER, COURTESY OF TASCHEN; FROM THE PIRELLI CALENDAR, 2005 BY PATRICK DEMARCHELIER, 
COURTESY OF TASCHEN; BY CHRIS GORMAN (3). 


liMIIIIIMIIIIIItlMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIHniHIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIMlinill 


liniMllllllllllllllllllllllllllinillllMIIIIMIIIIMIIIIMIIIIillllilllllHIIIIIIIllllllMIIIMIIinilllMlllllllinilllMIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiniHllllllllllllMI 


THE LINE TO WATCH: 

Noah 


As the creative director of 
Supreme, Brendon Babenzien 
infused the skate brand with 
a hip-hop-meets-sportswear 
cool: Sneakerheads camped out 
overnight for the newest limited 
editions while stylish guys ev- 
erywhere had to have the signa- 
ture hat bearing the company’s 
rectangular red logo. 

Now Babenzien is reviving 
Noah, a surf-and-skate ac- 
tivewear line that he started 
in the early 2000s (inspired by 
his surf-shop days growing up 
on the South Shore of Long 
Island). He says that creating 
technical pieces that don’t make 
you look like you’re training for 
the Olympics is all about the 
marriage of foundational basics 
and upscale fabrics. Think wind- 
breakers done in a Loro Plana 
Storm System material — 
a waterproof wool-cashmere 
blend — and lined with merino 
wool or a reversible water-resis- 
tant quilted coat (seen below). 

But just because the cloth- 
ing is a little more refined 
than hoodies doesn’t mean 
Babenzien has strayed far from 
his Supreme days: A wooden 
skate bowl anchored his pop-up 
shop in Tribeca this spring. “I’m 
not gonna touch it,’’ he says, “if 
it’s not a real part of my life.” 

Shirt ($1 88). Jacket ($1 .200). 




The Pirelli 
Calendar 
Turns 50 


Launched in 1964 as 


a corporate gift for 
the itaiian tire manufac- 
turer’s most prized 
ciients and ViPs, the 
Pireiii Caiendar quickiy 
shed its promotionai 
skin to become a cov- 
eted compiiation of the 
worid's most beautifui 
women shot by the best 


photographers around. 
Pirelli — The Calendar. 
50 Years and More 
(Taschen, $70) reunites 
every month of the 
caiendars aiongside 
behind-the-scenes 
images (not to men- 
tion photos initiaiiy 
deemed too provoc- 
ative for pubiication). 
Whether you’re in it 
for Giseie Biindchen, 
Naomi Campbeii, Kate 
Moss, or Adriana Lima 
or for the work of Nick 
Knight, Richard Ave- 
don, Annie Leibovitz, 
and Mario Testino, car 
taik never feit so racy. 


From top: An image from the 1 984 caiendar, shot 
in the Bahamas: Adriana Lima in 2005, shot in Rio 
de Janeiro by Patrick Demarchelier. 



Your 
Favorite 
Fragrance 
Is Now a 
Candle 


inspired by the top- 
seiiing fragrances in 
the fashion house’s 
Repiica coiiection, 
the three candies 
in Maison Martin 
Margieia’s new iine 
($60 each) have 
distinct oifactory 
footprints. Lazy 
Sunday Morning 
smeiis iike ciean 
sheets and iiiy of the 


vaiiey, and Beach 
Waik, a saity, citrusy 
mix, hoids true to 
its name. For cooier 
autumn evenings, 
try Jazz Ciub, which 
fiiis the room with 
notes of rum, ieather, 
and tobacco. Put on 
some Coitrane and 
it’s the next best 
thing to stopping by 
the Viiiage Vanguard. 



DETAILS AUGUST 201 5 55 






:• CHEAT SHEET 


IIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIMIII 


COME TOGETHER: 


The Collaborations 
to Know Now 

The season’s best partnerships double 
down on the great work these brands 
already do on their own. 


ADIDAS 

X 

KOLOR 


THE WHITE BRIEFS 
X 

NICK WOOSTER 


Zy2 

oe-£ 

OiTirj 
a: . ^ 


D-Z - 

— tJ 


Szo 

ooz 

0^2 t- 


0“2 

o<“ 

x>->- 

OicacQ 


o 

_L_ 

MONCLER 

X 

AMI 


THE DESIGNERS Italian outerwear giant Moncler, 
whose puffer jackets keep urbanites from freezing, 
and Paris’ AMI, which turns out basics in looser silhouettes. 

THE LOOK Moncler A renders AMI's typical drop-crotch pants and 
oversize Jackets in Moncler's high-performance fabrics. 

THE PIECE This wool coat is a thoughtful take on one of fall’s top 
trends: generously cut outerwear. The snap buttons and zip closure 
ensure that you’ll be warm when it’s worst outside. 


THE DESIGNERS Global 
giant Adidas and Kolor, 
Junichi Abe's take on 
Japanese streetwear. 

THE LOOK There’s a strong 
interplay of soft lines and 
technical fabrics, styled 
to mimic urban-ninja en- 
sembles: Baggy shorts are 
layered over tights; high 
collars and hoods add 
drama. 

THE PIECE(S) The silver 
inlays on this anorak give 
it a space-age slickness. 
Of course, it wouldn’t be 
Adidas without a sneaker, 
but the neon-green-and- 
white uppers are all Kolor. 

Anorak ($365) and sneakers 
($255) by Adidas by Kolor. 


THE DESIGNERS The 

Woolmark Company 
teamed Sweden’s the 
White Briefs, which 
makes slim-fitting 
loungewear, and style 
icon Nick Wooster. 

THE LOOK Merino-wool 
sweatshirts, briefs, and 
tanks bear the hall- 
marks of Scandinavian 
minimalism; the subtle 
detailing (longer shorts, 
a kimono-like robe) point 
toward Wooster. 

THE PIECE The deep-navy 
long-sleeved henley has 
hidden buttons; it’s the 
perfect transitional piece. 

Woolmark presents 
the White Briefs by Nick 
Wooster ($160). 


shirts, generous pro- 
portions) paired with 
luxe outerwear, much of 
which features patterns 
from Nemeth’s archives. 
THE PIECE This single- 
breasted black-and- 
camel wool-cashmere 
creation incorporates 
one of Nemeth’s favor- 
ite motifs: an enlarged 
woven-thread design. 
The bold pattern makes 
this a statement coat 
that can punch up even 
the most basic outfit. 

Coat ($6,750) by Louis 
Vuitton. 


LOUIS VUITTON 
X 

CHRISTOPHER NEMETH 


THE DESIGNERS Kim 

Jones, the men’s artistic 
director of Louis Vuitton, 
and the family of the late 
Christopher Nemeth, a 
trailblazing British illustra- 
tor and fashion designer 
known for deconstructed 
garments with an empha- 
sis on graphic prints. 

THE LOOK Jones’ street- 
style hallmarks (cuffed 
denim, buttoned-up 


56 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


Introducing the first ever 

FOOD UTILITY 



The NEW 

epicurious 

The Ultimate Food Resource 


I WANT TO COOK 


www.epicurious.com 




TASTEMAKER 




IMIllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinilllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIiniMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMlirillllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIMMIIM 

AS TOLD TO JON ROTH • PHOTOGRAPH BY MEGAN MACK 



Musician Albert Hammond Jr. 

The Strokes guitarist started dressing like 
a rock star way before he became one. 

With his third solo album, Momentary 
Masters, out this month, he talks about 
his modern spin on old-school style. 


58 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


3/ THE FRAGRANCE 

"I actually use women’s 
perfume — I have since 
I was a kid. It’s called 
AnaTs AnaTs, from Cacha- 
rel. It smells like a beauti- 
ful woman and a bouquet 
of flowers. I use that and 
Right Guard deodorant.” 

4/ THE SHOES 

“These Doc Martens were 
also made for me. I just 
wanted them to fit me 
better than the ones in 
the store. I’m someone 
who likes my top button 
fastened and my socks 
pulled up, so it would 
make sense that I like my 
laces tied up like this. It 
Just feels kind of snug.” 


1/ THE TIE 

“I actually Just made 
this tie. The tag says 
ALBERT HAMMOND JR. FOR 
JACQUES-ELLIOTT. He’s 
this young entrepreneur, 
and he wanted to mix 
Malcolm McLaren and 
Ralph Lauren, with the 
idea that you can wear 
it with a suit or you can 
wear it with a Jean Jacket. 
Ties were always my 
thing. When I was 18, on 
Sunday, when everyone 
was taking off for a ca- 
sual day, I’d wear a suit 
to go have brunch.” 


2/ THE HAIR 

“I get my hair cut at Free- 
mans Sporting Club on 
Rivington Street in New 
York. Jason Necker — he’s 
amazing. You’ll see him 
looking at every strand. 
He’s a pro. I don’t go to 
anyone else. Now that I 
live upstate. I’ll see him 
every couple of weeks. 
Just to keep it trimmed. 
It's become almost like a 
social thing: You just go 
and hang out and chat.” 


5/ THE SHIRT 

“This is from the Sock 
Hop, a place on Elizabeth 
Street where they make 
shirts for you. On the 
back, it has my name, 
and it’s fitted to you from 
scratch — you pick the 
fabric and the buttons 
and the collar. I actually 
wore this at my wedding.” 

6/ THE WATCH 

“An ex-girlfriend got me 
this Rolex for Christmas 
back around 2008. I don’t 
own another watch, and I 
feel like this is the kind of 
watch that you could hand 
down, you know? It seems 
timeless, exactly what I 
would have picked.” 

7/ THE WALLET 

“I’ve always had Paul 
Smith wallets, for some 
reason. Last December, I 
was delayed at Heathrow 
for, like, eight hours. 
Heathrow’s got great 
shopping, so I was Just 
bored and I went into the 
Paul Smith store and they 
had this red wallet. I was 
like, ‘Oh, this is gonna age 
well,’ got super-excited, 
and bought it there. 

The plane didn’t end up 
taking off, but the wallet 
took off. It’s a big hit.” 

8/ THE PANTS 

“These are Margiela. I skip 
the belt, because the whole 
point is that they fit. And I 
wear my pants higher- 
waisted anyway. I guess 
when it comes to that, 
my dress sense is a little 
more old-fashioned, but 
now everyone’s going for 
stuff with a higher waist, 
shorter legs. I used to get 
made fun of by the tailors 
when I asked for that.” 


\ 


GROOMING BY ALEJANDRA USING DIOR HOMME AT FACTORY DOWNTOWN. 



EVENT 


#DETAILSAFTRDARK WITH BETTY WHO 

DETAILS kicked off summer by bringing one of today's hottest new stars to the stage at the Bowery Hotel. Betty Who 
captivated the audience of VIPs and insiders with her electric energy and catchy hits, leaving them wanting more. 
Delicious Absolut Elyx cocktails kept the intimate crowd dancing long into the night. 


RJ King 2. Betty Who 3. Justin Wu. Nicote Warne S Teddy Tinson 4. John Targon & Scott Studenberg 
5. John Tuite & Carlos Santolatia 6. May Kwok 7. Eliza Cummings & Agel Raya 




style :• 


GROOMING 


IHIIMinilllllinnilllMlINMIlllllMIIIIIIIMUIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIi' 


‘■• i; 




Who Has Time for 
a 10-Step, 45-IVIinute 
Grooming Routine? 




Not most men in America, probably. 
At least not right now. But U.S. 
cosmetics companies are looking 
for inspiration in South Korea, where 
to say that men are obsessed with 
beauty products — serums, essences, 
ampoules — would be putting it mildly. 




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IN KOREAN, IT’S CALLED CHOK CHOK. IT 
translates roughly to “plump and moist,” 
and it’s the nicest thing you can say about 
someone's face. It’s so coveted that many 
South Koreans, men included, use lo or more 
skin-care products each morning and night 
to achieve it. Guys wash with an oil-based 
cleanser, followed by a foam. They exfoliate, 
focusing on the areas that don’t get hit with 
a razor. They prep their skin with a toner, 
massage in a series of essences, serums, and 
supercharged serums known as ampoules, 
apply a sheet mask, then moisturize with a 
lotion and an eye cream. The finale: sunscreen 
and a hydrating mist. Why the fuss? If Korean 
skin-care brands and their customers are to 
be believed, this routine will get you: (i) a 
dewy, wrinkle-free face; (2) out of bed earlier 
(the sequence takes about 45 minutes); (3) a 
better job; (4) more money (see No. 3); and 
(5) more sex. 

While this sounds like the stuff of teen- 
age dreams (and late-night infomercials), 
it’s serious business— approximately $10 
billion-a-year serious. In the past decade. 
South Korea’s beauty industry has become 
one of the world’s biggest. Though men ac- 



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60 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


llllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItllllllllllllllllllllllllllMllllllllllMllllllillllllMIIMIIIHIMIItlllllllll 





Layers upon layers: 
Some South Korean 
men have a tiered 
skin'Care regimen 
that’s calibrated to 
deliver a youthful, 
glowing complexion. 


d 

a 


if} 


count for a fraction of sales, about $635 mil- 
lion in 2013, demand continues to grow. And 
what they want is a visage that radiates like 
a baby’s. “Glowing skin is a major measure 
of total perceived wellness” in South Korea, 
says Joseph Scott Grigsby, vice president of 
global marketing and creative for Lab Series, 
a men’s luxury skin-care line. “Guys want to 
look perfect so they’re perceived that way.” 
Whether this thinking inspired Korean pop 
culture or vice versa is unclear. But after 
television shows like A Gentleman’s Dignity— 
basically Sex and the City with dudes— became 
hits while showcasing fastidious manicuring, 
public prettifying went mainstream. (By then, 
cosmetics CEO Yu Sang-Ok had entered his 
seventies with a memoir titled The CEO Who 
Wears Makeup and soccer star Ahn Jung-Hwan 
had become the face of Somang Cosmetics.) 

Chok chok sounds kind of crazy— but ex- 
ploring a $635 million business does not, 
so U.S. companies are looking east. “It 
used to be the French who led skin care; 


90 free minutes a day is a tough sell). Rich 
Beilis, 27, a New York City Web editor who 
pays attention to his skin, says, “When I buy 
products off the shelf, inevitably there will 
be some stubborn blemishes and dryness 
here or oil there,” he says. “If the Koreans can 
solve that for me, bless them— I’m on board. 
But they’d need to do it in fewer steps.” Still, 
we may be closer to living la vida chok chok 
than we think. As in Korea, the men’s share of 
the domestic personal-care market is grow- 
ing at a rapid clip. “We’re on the cusp of great 
change with the way men take care of their 
skin,” says Janet Pardo, senior vice president 
of global product development at Clinique. 
“We’re starting to see this incredible need 
and desire from men in North America to 
step it up a notch.” Already, Dr. Jart+, one of 
the first Korean brands to sell in the United 
States, is “slowly introducing more inten- 
sive routines for men,” says Richard You, 
the brand’s general manager. 

But is such a comprehensive regimen even 


“KOREAN MEN ARE GOING TO DRASTIO LENGTHS TO 
REDEFINE THEIR JAWLINE— INOLUDING SURGERY,” 
SAYS A LUXURY-SKIN-GARE EXEOUTIVE. “WE ASKED, 
‘HOW OAN WE DO THAT WITH INGREDIENTS?’” 


now American brands are taking direction 
from South Korea,” says Peter Thomas Roth, 
whose eponymous unisex skin-care line 
makes hydrating masks with Korean com- 
ponents like Jeju Island green tea. A snapshot 
of a cosmetics store’s shelf, like Sephora’s, 
proves Roth’s point. Every brand seems to 
offer something from the land of the morn- 
ing calm: There’s Clinique’s Even Better 
Essence Lotion, Neutrogena’s Hydro Boost 
Water Gel, Laneige’s Bright Renew Emulsion, 
and Roth’s own Un-Wrinkle Turbo 24k Gold 
Line Smoothing Toning Lotion. Grigsby says 
Lab Series’ brisk-selling MAX LS Age-Less 
Power V Lifting Cream, formulated to firm 
and tighten men’s jawlines, is a direct reac- 
tion to trends on the peninsula: “Korean men 
are going to drastic lengths to redefine their 
jawline— including surgery. We asked, ‘How 
can we do that with ingredients?’ ” 

Whether this daily ritual approaches 
“Gangnam Style” levels of popularity in the 
United States remains to be seen (finding 


good for you? Not necessarily. “A 10-step 
routine is simply way too drying,” says Dr. 
Jeannette Graf, an assistant clinical profes- 
sor of dermatology at the Icahn School of 
Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. 
“Before you even get to the serums, you’ve 
washed your face twice or more, causing a 
hydration imbalance.” To avoid that, Dave 
Cho, cofounder of Soko Glam, an e-tailer of 
Korean beauty products, suggests test-driv- 
ing the trend: Apply a toning lotion as an 
aftershave, or wear a hydrating sheet mask 
while brewing your morning coffee. What’s 
most important is being consistent. “Koreans 
don’t stay young-looking because their skin- 
care routine is 10 steps,” says Dr. Paul Jarrod 
Frank, a dermatologist and founder of the 
Fifth Avenue Dermatology Surgery and Laser 
Center in New York City. “They look good be- 
cause their routines are regular.” Your skin 
craves consistency, and it’ll reward you with 
an even, hydrated glow for doing the same 
thing every day. Call it whatever you want. ■ 


BY GRACE CLARKE • PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS GORMAN 



JliiFLY 17 + 18 






PHOTOGRAPHS BY RYAN PLETT STYLING BY EUGENE TONG 


64 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 



THIS PAGE: Suit by Tom Ford. Shirt by 
Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane. OPPOSITE, 
FROM LEFT: Clothing by Dolce & Gabbana, boots 
by Tommy Hilfiger. Suit and tie by Dunhill, sweater 
by Etro, shirt by Brooks Brothers, shoes by Louis 
Vuitton. Socks throughout by Gold Toe. 



THIS PAGE: Suit by Giorgio Armani. 

Shirt by Diesel Black Gold. 

OPPOSITE: Suit and shirt by Dsquareda. 

Tie by BruneUo Cucinelli. Shoes by To Boot New 
York. Watch by Glashiitte Original. 



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AUGUST 2015 67 






THIS PAGE: Suit and sweater by Berluti. T-shirt 
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OPPOSITE: Suit and shirt by Brioni. 

Tie by Ermenegildo Zegna. Shoes by Santoni. 



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AUGUST 201 5 


69 



70 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 



THIS PAGE, FROM LEFT: Suit by Canali, sweater 
by Brooks Brothers, sneakers by Spalwart. Suit 
and shirt by Ermenegildo Zegna, sweater by Gucci, 
sneakers by Maison Margiela, watch by 
Patek Philippe .OPPOSITE: Suit by Versace . 

Turtleneck by Wallace & Barnes. 



THIS PAGE: Michael Kors. 

OPPOSITE: Clothing and shoes by Prada. 
Watch by Patek Philippe. 

Grooming by MartinChristopher Harper 
at Platform/NYC using Bumble and bumble. 
Casting by Edward Kim at The Edit Desk. 



DETAILS 


AUGUST 2015 73 







SCAVENGER OF NIGHTCRAWLER TO THE DESPERATE, 
RULKED-UP RRAWLER IN THIS MONTH’S SOUTRPAW, 
JAKE GYLLENHAAL HAS PUSHED HIS HODY 
AND PSYCHE TO THE RRINK, CEMENTING HIS STATUS 
AS AN OSCAR FRONT-RUNNER AND HOLLYWOOD’S 

BY lOE LEVY DANGEROUS MAN. 

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MARK SELIGER 


“DO YOU ACTUALLY WANT TO KNOW HOW MANY SIT-UPS I DID?” JAKE GYLLENHAAL ASKS ME. 
“Are you easing me into the question?” 

We’re halfway through dinner at Gracias Madre, a vegan Mexican restaurant in Los Angeles— 
though neither of us is vegan— and there have heen a few interruptions. A table of young women 
next to us has grown progressively louder throughout the evening, either because of successive 
margaritas or, more likely, because of proximity to the A-lister. Gyllenhaal’s sister, Maggie, in 
town for just the day and also not a vegan, has stopped by unexpectedly, asking whether Jake 
got her text to meet her here. (He didn’t.) And an unapologetic fan has just arrived tableside 
asking for a photo, a request Gyllenhaal politely— and almost unsuccessfully— declines. (He: 
“I’m just doing an interview”; she: “Will you be long?”) 

The lingering question— what he discovered about the world during the five months he 
spent training for Southpaw, a dark drama about a light-heavyweight champ undone by his own 
brutality and forced to rebuild his life— actually has more to do with GyllenhaaTs head than 
with his abs. Tm not asking about sit-ups, at least in part because I already know the answer 
to that question. One thousand. That was in the morning. There were another 1,000 at night, 
a factoid repeated ad nauseam in the click-bait stories— JAKE gyllenhaal is ripped, inside 
JAKE gyllenhaal’s INSANE SOUTHPAW TRANSEORMATION, THE SURPRISING SECRET TO 
JAKE gyllenhaal’s SOUTHPAW WORKOUT PLAN— that have accompanied the eye-grabbing 
film stills floating around online. 

The training for Southpaw was savage and transformative. Gyllenhaal is almost unrecognizable 
as brawler Billy Hope, his body roped by sculpted muscle (itself covered in sweat and blood) 
and his face contorted in a grotesque, triumphant rictus. Right now, though, three lines crease 
GyllenhaaTs forehead. Worry lines, unusually deep given his 34 years. He’s wary of talking about 
all this— the eight-mile mns that preceded the two-a-day workouts that pushed him so far past 
his limits on his way to adding 15 pounds of muscle that he sometimes vomited on the floor. 
He can already see the narrative of body transformation taking shape. Two years ago, he lost 
30 pounds for Nightcrawler, to play Louis Bloom, a feral hustler who finds his calling selling 
accident footage to L.A. news stations. This new role, like that one, has ignited not only early 
Oscar buzz but also an infotainment-y obsession with GyllenhaaTs physical makeover, as well as 


his newfound athletic endurance. A few days 
before we meet, a clip from The Ellen DeGeneres 
Show surfaces in which DeGeneres prompts 
Gyllenhaal to jump rope to raise money for 
charity. “You’re such a good actor! You jump 
rope so fast!” DeGeneres says jokingly. 

It’s not the kind of ribbing you can imag- 
ine Christian Bale playing along with (“Now, 
exactly what did you binge on to gain that 
paunch for American Hustle?’’), and it’s even 
harder to imagine Robert De Niro, jump rope 
in hand, recounting his Raging Bull regimen. 
Gyllenhaal has never shied away from rigor- 
ous training: The five months he spent learn- 
ing to box for Southpaw are reminiscent of the 
five months in 2011 he spent immersed in the 
world of Los Angeles police work in prepara- 
tion for the 22-day End ofWatch shoot— from 
ride-alongs to shooting practice to fire train- 
ing (“That’s where you run into a burning 
building,” he explains). The physical meta- 
morphosis is really just an externalization 
of a process he goes through for every role. 

“I believe that. I really do,” Gyllenhaal says. 
“But I think we all see what we want to see. 
If you want to see a guy who has gotten into 
shape, then that’s what you see. But if you 
want to see what I feel, I think you have to 
look a little deeper.” 

There’s a pause as Gyllenhaal considers 
what he’s saying, or maybe how he’s saying 
it, and then a slight course correction. The 
point may be better made with the easygo- 
ing, sly sense of humor that’s always close 
at hand. “People have a lot of other shit they 
have to do that’s more interesting and more 
important, so I don’t blame them for being 
like, ‘Oh, wait, how many sit-ups did you 
have to do?’ Or, ‘Oh, wow, what did you eat 
to lose that much weight?’ But you’re missing 
the point. Nightcrawler was ironically about 
the trouble with that question. It was about 
why people only look at how much weight 
you lost, as opposed to what’s at the heart 
of what you’re doing. In that world, where we 
just focus on those things, somebody like Lou 
Bloom thrives. In fact, he rules.” 

IN 2010, GYLLENHAAL STARED INTO THE MIR- 
ror, saw a leading man looking back, and 
blinked— or so the line on him goes. That was 
the year that he starred in Love & Other Drugs, 
the romantic comedy in which he played a fre- 
quently undressed pharmaceutical rep, and 
Prince of Persia, a big-budget sword-and-san- 
dals epic adapted from a video-game series. 


76 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


N either movie fared well critically or commer- 
cially, and since then he’s heen making what 
are referred to in Hollywood as “interesting 
choices,” chasing drug cartels (End of Watch), 
kidnappers (the disturhing abduction drama 
Prisoners), car accidents (Nightcrawler), and— 
in Denis Villeneuve's strange and dreamy 
Pnemy— himself through films that offered 
little in the way of box-office glory and plenty 
of chances to map out darkness. And if that 
weren’t enough artistic cred, Gyllenhaal also 
explored theater, starring in two dramas by 
the British playwright Nick Payne, If There Is 
I Haven't Found It Yet and Constellations, his 
Broadway debut. This account of his turn 
toward the bleak and unconventional is so 
much the accepted wisdom that before he 
collects me at my hotel for dinner, a friend 
in New York e-mails, “1 hope he picks you up 
in a shitty Kia . . . just the latest in his bold, 
unexpected Hollywood choices.” 

“People say, ‘You made aU these changes in 
your life, and all your movies seem so differ- 
ent now. I really like the movies you’re mak- 
ing now,’ ” Gyllenhaal says. “Which implies 
that they didn’t . . .” There is a knowing smile 
and a low, mischievous chuckle. In truth, 
he’s been making dark, interesting movies 
for a long time, since Donnie Darko in 2001, 
and wrestling with masculine archetypes in 
many others: as a gay cowboy in Brokeback 
Mountain, a marine sniper in fathead, even 
the money-hungry ass man of Love & Other 
Drugs. It may be GyllenhaaTs life, more than 
his movies, that has changed. 

“I was trying to figure out a lot of stuff,” 
he says. He was in his twenties, unsure of his 
“place in things.” That’s the way he puts it 
now. He put it more bluntly to David Ayer, the 
director of End of Watch, as Ayer recounted in a 
2012 interview with the entertainment-news 
website HitFix: “Tm sick of everything,” he 
recalled Gyllenhaal telling him. “Tm sick of 
my life and I want to change it.” 

At a distance, it feels less like a sickness 
than a search. “We’re all told we’re going to 
get to a place where those things will come 
together, where we’ll somehow be whole or 
happy or whatever it is,” he says. “So I went 
searching.” 

What he hoped to find was collaborative 
directors, stories that draw on the subcon- 
scious, and the chance to work out issues he 
himself was facing. In Enemy, he plays both a 
meek college professor and the man’s dop- 
pelganger, a bearded, macho actor with the 


key to a sex club. The two characters offered 
him a chance to wrestle with the idea of 
reconciling intimacy and lust, and, more 
important, to stage a confrontation with the 
self at a time when that’s precisely what he 
was doing in real life. 

“I was at a place in my life where I felt total- 
ly split,” he says. “I had just moved from Los 
Angeles to New York.” His sister and her hus- 
band, Peter Sarsgaard, live in Brooklyn with 
their two young daughters. His mother, the 
screenwriter and director Naomi Foner, also 
eventually settled in New York following her 
split from the director Stephen Gyllenhaal 
after three decades of marriage in 2008. 
“There’s a period of time in your life, in your 
twenties, when you’re listening to a lot of 
other people’s opinions,” Gyllenhaal says. 
“You’re not sure about what you believe in, 
and you’re moving in a direction that you feel 
like looks right to other people. And then you 
think. Wait, what do I feel? What do I want? 
What moves me? It’s not always so pure and 
clear. It’s not like I have my agent on one 
shoulder and my pure artist on the other.” 

IF IT’S THE PURE ARTIST WHO PICKS ME UP, HE’S 
driving a very Hollywood car: a white BMW 
SUV. (“You can write about the car,” he says 
jokingly, “but it doesn’t belong to me— it’s a 
friend’s.”) He wears the off-duty actor’s uni- 
form: blue T-shirt, Levi’s, and Nikes, with a 
blue baseball cap and tortoiseshell shades. 
During the short ride to Gracias Madre, we 
discover we are both grandchildren of doc- 
tors— his grandmother and grandfather on 
his mother’s side were physicians— and that 
both of our grandfathers occasionally won- 
dered when we might get a real job. Neither 
was exactly kidding. 

GyllenhaaTs maternal grandmother, Ruth 
Achs, was a pioneering pediatrician who 
taught at the Downstate Medical Center in 
Brooklyn. She died at 48, in 1968, 12 years 
before he was born. But he knew his mater- 
nal grandfather, Sam Achs, well. Sam was 
a surgeon who lived to 94, passing away in 
January 2014. He was an intensely disciplined 
man— forever on time, if not early, planning 
things out months in advance— who awoke 
at 4 A.M. every day. “My grandfather always 
wore a bow tie, particularly when he was 
working,” Gyllenhaal says. “He was really 
slow in how he would speak, very careful. He 
saved a lot of lives that way, in that he never 
would overreact. I didn’t inherit that quality. 


but I did inherit the discipline.” 

Gyllenhaal traces his disciplined work ethic 
to his father, Stephen, as well. When he was 
8 or 9, growing up in Los Angeles, Gyllenhaal 
would wake up early in the morning and go 
mnning vrith him before school. Stephen was 
athletic, a top-ranked wrestler in high school 
in Pennsylvania, but also had an artistic side. 
“My dad played viola and was also on the 
football team,” Gyllenhaal says. “He grew 
up in a small town, very religious, Christian. 
When he brought a Jewish girl home, it was 
a very particular thing. But he was Swedish, 
and so always an adventurer. He’s the guy 
that says if you’re anywhere near an ocean 
and you don’t get in, you’re doing yourself 
a big disservice. And I always feel him. If a 
storm is about to come, he’s the guy who’s 
like, ‘Look how big the waves are— let’s get in 
them for a little hit.’ ” 

That’s the side of Gyllenhaal that has led 
him to challenging parts requiring intense 
physical and emotional commitments, 
including playing the mountaineer Scott 
Fischer in Baltasar Kormakur’s Fvercst, open- 
ing in September, based on the ill-fated 1996 
expedition that claimed the lives of eight 
climbers. “Balt wanted to make the movie 
in the real environments,” he says. “I didn’t 
want to be sitting on a soundstage making 
some fake movie about Mount Everest, and 
he didn’t do that.” 

That’s putting it mildly. Kormakur shot in 
IMAX 3D, in Nepal as well as in the Dolomites 
of northeastern Italy. That’s where Gyllenhaal 
joined the production in February 2014. “It 
hadn’t snowed that much in 60 years,” 
Kormakur says. “There was an avalanche 
warning every day on the call sheet. It was 
grueling.” They were filming at elevations of 
9,000 to 12,000 feet, in temperatures reach- 
ing negative 30 degrees Celsius. “Jake was 
tough. He went to the limit. It’s all real. His 
nose was frozen, his beard was frozen, and 
we were blowing more snow over him, but 
he wouldn’t give up. And then he wanted to 
improvise— improvise in minus 30!” 

Southpaw’s director, Antoine Fuqua— him- 
self a boxer since 14— saw this fearlessness in 
Gyllenhaal as well. “He had the will to be in 
pain and go every day and get punched and 
train and spar,” he says. For Billy Hope, who 
spends much of the film “learning that you 
can’t be a part-time father,” Fuqua knew he 
had to find a young actor who was in the pro- 
cess of becoming a man. “I thought. Shit, he’s 


DETAILS AUGUST 201 5 77 



Blazer and pants by 
Salvatore Ferragamo. 
Sweater by Gucci. T-shirt by 
Save Khaki United. Boots by 
Calvin Klein Collection. 

Styling by Benjamin Sturgill. 
Grooming by Cori Bardo using 
Oribe. Set design by Andy 
Henbest for frankreps.com. 
Production by Ruth Levy. Local 
production by F32 Productions. 


* YOUR INITIAL INSTINCT [IN A FIGHT] IS TO LEAN OUT/* 

GYLLENHAAL SAYS. IT S THE INSTINCT TO 
LEAN IN THAT TOOK ME FIVE MONTHS. HITTING SOMEONE-I DON T HAVE AS MUCH OF 

A PRORLEM WITH THAT. RUT I DON T LIKE TO GET HIT.** 


Jake. And nobody else believed me.” 

If others couldn’t see what Fuqua saw, it 
might be because they were looking at the 
Gyllenhaal of Nightcrawier. “Skinny dude, 147 
pounds,” Fuqua says of their first meeting. “I 
was shocked when I saw him.” (Kormakur con- 
curs: “When he came to rehearsals, he was only 
half the guy I had hired.”) Fuqua had to find 
out whether Gyllenhaal could portray a boxer, 
so he sent him to meet his own trainer, Terry 
Claybon, at the LB4LB gym in Los Angeles. 
“Terry called me up and said, ‘Hell no, man. 
Are you sure you got the right guy?’ ” Fuqua 
recalls. “I said, ‘I’m a hundred percent sure. 
This guy is special.’ When I told Jake to go 
train, it wasn’t that he was an amazing boxer. 
He just has desire to do it. He got gutted out. 
I said, ‘This guy’s got fire in him.’ People just 
didn’t see it. They’re starting to see it now. 
Jake is coming out of his shell as a man.” 

Part man, part monster. Fuqua would 
climb into the ring with Gyllenhaal and 
challenge him toe-to-toe, and unlike World 
Boxing Association title bouts, their fight 
sequences didn’t end after 12 rounds. “He 
was fighting more than a champion boxer 
would,” Gyllenhaal’s costar Rachel McAdams 
says. “He was going hundreds of rounds 
a day to get the shot, day after day.” When 
Gyllenhaal’s lungs were burning and his arms 
heavy, Fuqua would ask, “Are you the guy that 
gives up and sits on the stool and throws in 
the towel, or are you the one that gets out 
there and is a fucking beast?” 

“Antoine asked me to bring out my ani- 
mal,” Gyllenhaal says. But Southpaw also 
offered Gyllenhaal a chance to weigh ques- 
tions from his life. “[Billy Hope] is me in a 
lot of ways,” he says. “There are things that 
I wanted to explore: the idea of what anger 
is, what it does, if it can be productive. It’s 
obviously destructive, but is there a way in 
which you can harness it without rage, so it 
can actually teach you?” 

One thing he learned is how it felt to be hit, 
how to take a punch and keep going. “They 
were always playing hardball— there was 
never any letting up,” says McAdams, who 
watched Gyllenhaal get pummeled during 
filming. “I was very worried for him, but I 
knew he had it under control.” 

“I got hit pretty hard in the face,” GyUenhaal 
confirms. “All the producers ran [over]. I 
don’t think out of real worry for me, but just 
the fact that we were only two weeks into 
shooting.” He laughs, then continues: “There 


is something jarring about being hit in the 
face. I don’t know how to explain it. It wakes 
me up.” These are lessons most people spend 
their lives avoiding, but ones that Gyllenhaal 
sought out. “Your initial instinct is to lean 
out,” he says. “It’s the instinct to lean in that 
took me five months. Hitting someone— 
I don’t have as much of a problem with that.” 
There’s another low chuckle. “But I don’t like 
to get hit.” 

NEAR THE END OF DINNER, VEGAN ICE CREAM 
ordered, our conversation shifts to an ear- 
lier stop on Gyllenhaal’s path to manhood, 
one with presumably less punching: his bar 
mitzvah. Though he was raised in a secular 
household and studied Eastern religions 
at Columbia University, he celebrated the 
Jewish rite of passage at 13, albeit in an atyp- 
ical way. Bar mitzvahs are often lavish affairs; 
his was not. His family invited his classmates 
and friends to volunteer at a homeless shel- 
ter. The idea, his mother explained, was 
that “being a good man, if you were going 
to become a man, was the most important 
part of it.” 

When I bring up this well-circulated bit 
of Gyllenhaal family history, he deflects. 
“What does she know?” he says jokingly, 
then flashes a conspiratorial grin. The seri- 
ous answer follows. “What else is there but 
the journey of trying to be a good person, 
or a good man?” Gyllenhaal asks. “In this 
incarnation, that seems to be my goal. It’s a 
complicated thing, because I think the idea of 
good doesn’t subtract complexities, doesn’t 
subtract darkness.” 

On our way out, we briefly join his sister 
at her table. The paparazzi have shown up to 
document the reunion, and with the help of 
the waitstaff, a departure reminiscent of the 
Goodfdlas Copacabana tracking shot in reverse 
unfolds: We exit through the kitchen in hopes 
of leaving privately, to no avail. A cluster of 
Louis Bloom nightcrawlers await. As Maggie 
gets into her car and then, moments later, 
Jake and I climb into the borrowed BMW SUV, 
the air lights up with camera bursts, and one 
photographer sidles up to the driver’s side 
to ask what turns out to be the night’s last 
question. 

“Jake ... do the ladies like the scruff, or do 
they prefer clean-shaven?” 

Gyllenhaal turns to me, flashes a darker 
version of that conspiratorial grin, and steps 
on the gas. ■ 


DETAILS AUGUST 201 5 79 



Glashutte Oeiginal 




Omega 


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82 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


Jaquet Droz 







Girard-Peeregaux 





Patek Philippe 


84 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 



TAG Heuee 


PROP STYLING BY JILL NICHOLLS AT BRYDGES MACKINNEY. 





ARTISTS 



With a museum opening every other week and auction prices ascending into the 
stratosphere, the hunt for the next Jeff Koons or Cindy Sherman is on. To find the top 
contenders, we searched galleries and studios from coast to coast. Whether they’re 
putting a modern spin on traditional, time-tested techniques or pushing forward into 
the digital frontier, the creative minds on the following pages are leading the cultural 
vanguard. Introducing the future of American art. 


BY MAXWELL WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHS BY DOUG DUBOIS 



Dean Levin 





Mm 






AGE 26 

MEDIA Monochrome colors painted on 
panels of plaster-filled Lycra; grids printed 
on polished steel; oil paintings on linen 
canvas 

BONA FIDES A recent show at the prestigious 
Boesky East in New York City, where his works 
sold for up to $24,000; a growing waiting list 
for his pieces 


BACKSTORY “When I moved to New York, 1 
came to he a sculptor, hut my mom wanted 
me to make sure I got a j oh when I graduated,” 
says Levin. He responded hy studying archi- 
tecture at the Pratt Institute. Having grown 
up a Southern California skate rat, he first 
got the art world’s attention as a member of a 
loose-knit crew of hip young Brooklyn artists. 
“Every exhibition Dean creates is site-specific,” 


notes Elbe Rines, a veteran of Sotheby’s and ~ 
Christie’s who now owns the trendsetting 
gallery 55 Gansevoort. “It would be great to 
see him make a large public sculpture.” Which 
is fitting: Grids, curves, convex forms, and a 
general exploration of space pervade Levin’s 
output. “I want all of my work to have a linear 
and cohesive path,” he says. “So the architect 
in me will probably stay as long as he can.” 


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Paul Anthony Smith 

AGE 27 

MEDIA Photographs scored to obscure the 
identities of their subjects; gauzy paintings 
of Jamaican laborers 

BONA FIDES Represented by Zieher Smith & 
Horton in New York, where his works fetch up 
to $12,000; included in numerous museums’ 
permanent collections 
BACKSTORY Every couple of years. Smith trav- 
els from his base in New York City to his child- 
hood home of Port Antonio, Jamaica, where 
he takes photos of the working-class locals. 
But he’s not a photographer, per se; he either 
paints over the prints or turns them into 
“picotages,” pricking hundreds of tiny holes 
in the surface. The resulting works— which the 
New York Times described as “clouds of scintil- 
lation’’— look like still pictures beamed over a 


staticky television set. “I’m re-prxelating the 
image,” he says. “With these photos, you don’t 
know the complete story. I’m only showing 
you the idea and disguising the figures.” The 
process and subject matter reveal the influ- 
ence of art from the African diaspora. “Paul 
is a cut-and-mix creator— his painting-pico- 
tage aesthetic negotiates political and social 
inequities,” says Erika Dalya Massaquoi, 
who included Smith in the traveling group 
show “Disguise: Masks & Global African Art,” 
which visits the Brooklyn Museum of Art next 
year. This focus on the black experience and 
his Jamaican heritage is a running theme in 
Smith’s work. “I don’t know if it’s something 
I’m always going to explore,” he says. “But I 
yearn to know what I was destined to do if I’d 
stayed there. It’s kind of a missed connection.” 


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Jamian Juliano-Villani 

AGE 28 

MEDIUM Large-scale acrylic paintings that mash 
up obscure pop-culture images and resemble 
tripped-out Saturday-morning cartoons 
BONA FIDES An exhibition at the Museum of 
Contemporary Art Detroit; paintings have sold 
for up to $45,000 and have been bought by the 
likes of Leonardo DiCaprio and Jeffrey Deitch. 
BACKSTORY “When I saw Jamian’s work for 
the first time, I knew right away that she was 
taking painting in a new direction,” says Jens 
Hoffmann, the deputy director at the Jewish 
Museum in New York. “Her work feels very 
authentic, organic, and liberated.” It’s high 
praise, but for Juliano-Villani, this kind of 
reaction from critics, curators, and collec- 
tors is par for the course. Lowbrow-culture 
mavens can pick out a billion different ref- 


erences on the Newark, New Jersey, native’s 
canvases: gangsters and greasers; vintage ads; 
cartoons from Chuck Jones, Ralph Bakshi, and 
old Mad magazines; voluptuous sexpots who 
would make R. Crumb blush. Appropriation 
has a long history in art, from Picasso to 
Warhol to Koons. In essence, the Brooklyn art- 
ist makes the visual equivalent of the badass 
mixtape your older brother gave you— cool, 
obscure, and educational all at once. “I like 
obscure references for a reason. If I don’t like 
something. I’m not going to use it. I would 
never put Disney shit in my paintings, ever,” 
she says. “Everyone’s talking about what’s 
new in painting. It’s like, ‘Yo, chill out.’ All 
the good paintings have already been made, 
and there’s a lot of things that we missed. 
They just need a new context.” 


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Dashiell Manley 

AGE 31 

MEDIA Outsize watercolors of New York Times 
front pages; sculptures; installations; videos 
BONA FIDES Included in last year’s Whitney 
Biennial and in the collections of the Hammer 
Museum and lacma 

BACKSTORY Manley loves the idea of the 
remix. For his ongoing shot-for-shot reimag- 
ination of The Great Train Robbery, which he 
was drawn to for the classic 1903 Western’s 
innovative editing and narrative techniques, 
he uses painting, animation, and video to 
slowly— veij! slowly— re-create the movie from 
scratch. “Dashiell’s work is compelled by var- 
ious forms of time and narrative structures,” 
notes Michelle Grabner, an acclaimed artist 
who worked with Manley when she co-curat- 
ed the 2014 Whitney Biennial and who says 
she’s eager to see how the artist will pursue 


his fascination with developing modes of 
communication. In recent work, the native 
Californian has been using watercolor pen- 
cils to transcribe the entire front page of 
the New York Times from a few days prior- 
traces of the past few months’ news cycle 
eerily repeated in the scrawled words Ebola, 
Ferguson, Ukraine, and ISIS. “I would like to 
think I have a subjective relationship to the 
news and current events, but it affects me 
on a primal or emotional level,” Manley says 
from his studio in L.A.’s Echo Park. “When I 
started this project, the first few weeks made 
me incredibly depressed. But I became inter- 
ested in the value of the newspaper, which 
contains what you need to know about today 
but is worthless tomorrow. The speed and 
rapidity at which these objects lose their 
value was the primary interest.” 


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Jacolby Satterwhite 

AGE 29 

MEDIA Short films combining CGI, carnal performance art, music, and photography; sculpture 
BONA FIDES Included in the 2014 Whitney Biennial; a solo show at OHWOW Gallery in Los 
Angeles, where his prints and sculptures went for up to $40,000; participated in Jay Z’s “Picasso 
Baby” performance at the Pace Gallery in New York City 

BACKSTORY “There’s a freedom to his work,” says Emma Reeves, creative director of MOCAtv 
at the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, of Satterwhite, who’s based in New York 
City. “There’s something low-fi about the performances, but they’re really mesmerizing.” With 
their disturbing video clips, pulsing beats, and sexually explicit images, his mind-bending 
computer-animated works evoke a drug-fueled club scene fed through a digital kaleidoscope. 
At their heart are strange 3-D-rendered versions of old inventions that his mother, who was 
diagnosed with schizophrenia when Satterwhite was young, dreamed up for the Home 
Shopping Network as a way to cope with her illness. “That’s where the idiosyncratic, floating 
text and weird 3-D objects come from,” says the artist, who was raised in Columbia, South 
Carolina. “I was brought up in a formalist school, and once those formalist things are solid. 
I’m not necessarily apologetic about the bold political gestures I make.” Not that he takes 
life too seriously: “I’m also very fun and young and youthful, and I go to clubs and I dance.” 




Kour Pour 

AGE 27 

MEDIUM Towering acrylic paintings that rein- 
terpret historical artifacts like Persian rugs, 
embroidered textiles, and ancient hiero- 
glyphics 

BONA FIDES Paintings, which sell for up to 
$200,000, in the private collections of Orlando 
Bloom, Sean Parker, and tiber-collectors Dean 
Valentine and Cliff and Mandy Einstein 
BACKSTORY “My work is open to everything: 
sculpture, miniature painting, textiles, 
Victorian wallpaper,” says Pour, who lives 
in Los Angeles. “There are no rules for the 
sources.” Born in England, he gained notice 
for his ornate paintings of antique rugs, 
which helped him connect with his Iranian 
father’s history as a carpet seller but were also 
jokey jabs at people’s expectations of him as 
an Iranian artist. Pour’s recent paintings are 
every bit as strange and opulent as the rug 
works and are made with a similar technique 
of sanding away the veneer, which leaves 
the pieces looking worn and distressed. But 
where the old paintings were representation- 
al, the new work is interpretive: jumbles of 
religious and ethnographic symboUsm pulled 
directly from the Internet. 

“Kour is developing a strong, deep-rooted, 
and expansive studio practice,” says Stefan 
Simchowitz, the controversial consultant 
called “The Art World’s Patron Satan” by the 
New York Times. “In five years, I am sure he will 
have worked out many more directions for his 
work. It is all about the studio practice and 
being able to sustain and build consistently 
over time a solid and advancing system of 
production.” Though he’s not concerned with 
repeating himself. Pour has recently shifted 
his aesthetic focus toward the spiritual. “If 
you’re a believer, you’re led to these images 
and have a spiritual connection with them, 
and they have power. And the nonbeliever 
is going to say, ‘This has been taken out of 
context, they mean nothing. They’re kitsch 
and decorative,’ ” Pour says. “What I’m inter- 
ested in is making records of the way we’re 
experiencing information.” 



Hugh Scott-Douglas 

AGE 27 

MEDIUM Labyrinthine installations that 
include large laser-printed canvases decon- 
structing the language of currency 
BONA FIDES In the collections of the 
Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the 
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and 
Francois Pinault; auction sales above $80,000 
BACKSTORY Born in England and raised in 
Canada, Scott-Douglas (below) came of age in 
the tiny Toronto art scene, where he cofound- 


ed the influential Tomorrow Gallery. “I’m very 
envious of how, at such a young age, Flugh is 
so clued in to the workings of the art world,” 
says the Japanese artist Takashi Murakami. “It 
was unimaginable for me at his age.” Scott- 
Douglas’ early canvases were made with old 
photographic techniques, but the recent 
output is thoroughly modern: enlarged frag- 
ments of $100 bills and torn-up checks, high- 
priced watches, and other commodities. The 
focus on currency and consumer culture is 


interesting (some might say confrontation- 
al), given who is collecting his work. “I find 
his intellectual games highly inspirational,” 
Murakami says. Flow does Scott-Douglas see 
it? “I don’t think you’ll find that anything I’ve 
written is actively promoting a leftist agenda, 
but it’s something that I spend almost all my 
time reading about,” he explains. “There’s a 
hint of it in my last press release that talks 
about a Lenin quote: ‘The capitalists will sell 
us the rope with which we will hang them.’ ” 



Ryder Ripps 

AGE 29 

MEDIA Six-by-six-foot oil paintings of social- 
media celebrities; immersive Internet-based 
installations; subversive marketing campaigns 
BONA FIDES Clients at his marketing compa- 
ny, OKFocus, include Diesel, Kenzo, Soylent, 
and M.I.A. 

BACKSTORY “Ryder crosses over new media, 
the art world, the fashion world, and the music 
world,” says Nicola Formichetti, artistic direc- 
tor at Diesel. “Fle’s the only artist who’s using 


the Internet in the right way.” Controversy 
seems to follow Ripps (opposite), a New 
York City native who was exploiting social 
media long before Richard Prince’s Instagram 
firestorm blew up this summer. Ripps’ exhi- 
bition “Ho”— which showcased his distorted 
paintings of model Adrianne Ho’s Instagram 
feed— had Jezebel and other feminist sites call- 
ing for his head. For his “ART WHORE” project, 
he hired sensual-massage workers to draw 
whatever they wanted, and in his most recent 


exhibition, “Alone Together,” he deconstmct- 
ed a social network by hiring “users” to surf 
the Web in full view of the audience. The goal? 
To dissect how we digest new media. “Humor 
is a great tool because it has no rules,” Ripps 
says. “Art, through the academic machine, 
becomes an unapproachable, overly intellec- 
tual, snobby thing. Duchamp's toilet was a 
great commentary on what society expects of 
art and how we understand images. But when 
it was made, it was really just a punk joke.” 





Long before anyone barked "lA/ho are you wearing?" at awards-show attendees, Giorgio Armani revolutionized the 
relationship between entertainment and fashion, both as a costume designer and as a pioneer of red-carpet style. In 1975, 
he launched his first menswear collection from his home city of Milan, and five years later he created the looks for Richard 
Gere in American Gigolo, an auspicious introduction to American audiences, who had never seen anything like his neutral color 
palette, relaxed silhouettes, and innovative mix of linens and silks. On the occasion of the brand's 40th anniversary, we asked 
some well-dressed men who know the clothes— and the man himself— to share their thoughts on Armani's enduring legacy. 



INTERVIEWS BY MAX BERLINGER, JUSTIN EENNER, ANTONINA JEDRZEJCZAK, 
JON ROTH, AND DAVID WALTERS. PHOTOGRAPH BY LIONEL KORETZKY 




MARTIN SCORSESE: Giorgio has 
aiways ioved movies. He actualiy 
helped us make My Voyage to Italy, 
my documentary on the history 
of Italian cinema. Movies have 
had a great influence on his 
style, on his sense of clothing, 
on his art. 

ROBERT DE NIRO: I've known 
Armani a long time, at least 
25 years, because Marty had 
worked with him on a documen- 
tary. And Brian De Palma had 
him do the costumes for The 
Untouchables. He didn't actually 
do mine, though ... I felt like Al 
Capone wouldn't wear Armani. 

SCORSESE: In Made in Milan 
[Scorsese's 20-minute short doc 
about Armani], he talks about the 
effect of American stars of the 
forties on his work— Cary Grant, 
for instance— and it's interesting 
to note that Cary Grant had a 
hand in designing the clothes he 
wore on screen. But on a more 
general level, it seems to me 
that Giorgio thinks cinematically, 
because when you think of his 
designs, you think of them in 
motion. That's not often the case 
with designers: You think of the 
clothes, and you see them in 
poses, settings. With Giorgio, it's 
always dynamic. 

DAN STEVENS: I'm a child of the 
eighties. I grew up with that 
sense of Armani being synony- 
mous with chic sophistication. 

I was very affected by American 
Gigolo and Richard Gere and how 
Hollywood embraced the brand. 

RICHARD GERE: That was all 
[writer-director] Paul Schrader. I 
remember quite well him saying 


that he was sensing a new dan- 
dyism. This was extremely far 
away from my world. I don't think 
I even owned a suit at that point. 
Certainly not a tie. Paul was 
trying to make a European film, 
very influenced by Bertolucci and 
Visconti. Bertolucci's production 
designer, Ferdinando Scarfiotti, 
designed the movie and was 
involved with costumes as well. 
When I first tried the clothes on, 
Nando looked at me and said, "I 
think these are a little extreme 
for you." [Loughs] It was radical. 
Big shoulders, pleating— it was 
making a statement. 

JON HAMM: American Gigolo was 
the touchstone of that cool 
eighties style— and it holds up 
remarkably well, by the way. 

GERE: The scene that Giorgio 
loves is the one where I'm pick- 
ing out the clothes, singing along 
to Smokey Robinson, pulling out 
the shirts, matching them with 
the ties, dancing around the 
room like a little girl. The delight 
of that scene, I think, is what 
Giorgio responds to— the delight 
of fabrics, clothes, costumes. 



LIAM NEESON: When Schindler's 
List came out 22 years ago, I got 
a call from my agent saying Mr. 
Armani wanted to dress me for 
an event. I knew nothing about 
fashion. I had one good suit for 
a good occasion. I'll never forget 
the knots in my stomach. I knew 
we'd made a good film. But the 
fact that Armani was involved? It 
really made me nervous. 

HAMM: It's one of those phone 
calls you never expect to receive. 
It's like, "lAlhatl Giorgio Armani? 
The Giorgio Armani?" 

CLIVE OWEN: When I was nom- 
inated for an Oscar for Closer, I 
was invited to go to Milan to get 
personally fitted for my tux. The 
third jacket I tried on, Mr. Armani 
said, "This is perfect— this is the 
one," and the tailor pinned it. He 
asked if I liked it, and I said, "To 
be honest, it's a little tight and 
uncomfortable." He looked at 
me, and in Italian— which some- 
body translated for me— he said, 
"We're not about being relaxed 
and comfortable. We're about 
looking good." 

CHADWICK BOSEMAN: 

Sometimes on the red carpet, 
the clothes are a little tighter 
than you're used to. You're not 
allowed to breathe. Now that I'm 
used to it, I'm like, "Can you bring 
the legs in more?" I would have 
never said that before working 
with Armani. [Loughs] 

ARMIE HAMMER: Armani had 
one of their tailors fly over from 
Italy to custom-fit my suit for 
the upcoming press tour for The 
Man From U.N.C.L.E. I have a very 
awkward body to dress— my left 
arm is about an inch higher, and 



my right arm is about two inches 
longer— but this guy was able 
to put the pins in all the right 
places. My stylist and I both sat 
there slack-jawed, like, "Wait, go 
back and show us exactly how 
you did that!" 

HAMM: I have a made-to-mea- 
sure tuxedo with my name inside. 
I'll never give it up. The quality of 
the material and the workman- 
ship— it almost feels liquid. 

CHRIS PINE: The tuxedo that I 
wore for the last Oscars was 
double-breasted. I've always had 
an interest in Old Hollywood— the 
movie stars, the romance that I 
remember from all those great 
black-and-white photographs of 
Cary Grant, Humphrey Bogart, 
and Clark Gable. I tend not to go 
for really aggressive styles. I like 
simple, old-world, elegant, and 
that perfectly corresponds to 
who Mr. Armani is. 

SAMUEL L. JACKSON: Amazingly 
enough, one of the first things 
I got from him to wear to an 
Academy Awards presenta- 
tion was a violet dinner jacket. 
Everybody was like, "Really?" But 
he made it, and I wore it, and it 
was a hit. I don't look like your 
average penguin at red-carpet 
events. I stand out from the 
crowd, and Armani allows me to 
be a unique individual. 

STEVENS: My first big studio 
picture was Night at the Museum: 
Secret of the Tomb, and the pre- 
miere was a big deal, lots of 
press. Armani came up with a 
look that was so perfect. We 
built the whole look around these 
punky, silver-studded brogues— a 
tux with a twist. 



PROP STYLING BY JILL NICHOLLS AT BRYDGES MACKINNEY. PHOTOGRAPHS. CLOCKWISE EROM TOP: 
PHOTOFEST; COURTESY OF ARMANI; GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF ARMANI. 





PHOTOGRAPHS, FROM LEFT: GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF ARMANI {2). 


BOSEMAN: Armani custom-made 
my suit for the Get On Up pre- 
miere at the Apollo Theater. 

When they said, "Let's make 
one," I said, "That's exactly what 
James Brown would have done." 
They put my name Inside and 
everything. That was a surprise. 

JACKSON: That violet jacket is 
now part of Armani's permanent 
traveling collection. I wanted to 
keep it, but I never got it back! 
Now, I do still have that leather 
jacket from Shaft— shiny on the 
outside, rough leather on the 
inside. I still wear it occasionally, 
and people always say, "Oh my 
God, that's the jacket!" 

RICKY MARTIN: The first time 
we worked together was in 
1998, when I became the face of 
Giorgio Armani. Since then, he's 
outfitted three of my tours, and 
I've had the honor of doing my 
first runway with him. When I told 
him I wanted to walk, he said, 

"Oh, Ricky, I would love that . . . 
but do you mind if you get rec- 
ognized?" I thought that was the 
cutest thing. He's so humble! "Mr. 
Armani, of course I don't mind!" 

GERE: Giorgio's been extremely 
generous to me. Once, I had to 
fly from India to Rome unexpect- 
edly, and it was freezing, and 
I had no appropriate clothes. I 
go to the Armani shop, and of 
course they greet me, but they 
say, "Look, all our warm stuff 
is gone now." So they call up 
to Giorgio in Milan, and within 
an hour, they send down all the 
warm stuff for me to have, right 
to the hotel. He didn't have to 
do it, but it was a matter of filial 
generosity and a grand gesture 
that he's capable of. 

Top: Richard Gere in American 
Gigolo (1980). From ieft: 
Martin Scorsese with Giorgio 
Armani on the set of Made 
in Milan (1990); Jon Hamm at 
London's Royal Opera House 
in 2010; Clive Owen with 
Armani at the 2007 Armani 
Prive show at Paris Fashion 
Week; Chris Pine at the 2015 
Vanity Fair Oscar Party; a 
Samuel L. Jackson costume 
sketch from Shaft (2000); 
Armani with Robert De Niro 
in an undated photo from the 
Armani digitai archives. 


MARTIN: He's always been very 
generous. He invites us over to 
his house, and when my kids 
were born, he invited them to 
enter the world of Armani lunior. 
He's like a family member: very 
picky, very selective, very honest. 

DE NIRO: Giorgio came to the 
set when we were filming 
Casino— this was about 20 years 
ago— and gave me this great 
scarf made from this fine sheep's 
wool, very hard to get, from the 
Himalayas or the Andes. 

MATT BOMER: It comes from the 
inside out with Armani— the way 
they run their business. It's a 
family affair, and if you're lucky 
enough to get to know them, you 
feel like they've adopted you into 
a loving Italian family. 

HAMM: It's an incredible com- 
pliment to have them bring you 
into their world, which is so 
phenomenal and stylish and chic. 
And every time I meet him. I'm 
just like, "Okay, you're the cool- 
est guy in the room." Wherever 
he is— Cannes, London, on his 
yacht— he's impeccably dressed 
and looks like he didn't even 
have to try. 

DE NIRO: I sailed on that boat 
once, probably 10, 12 years ago, 
in the Caribbean. It was a very 
nice boat, if I remember. [Loughs] 
I've always liked his parties. 

OWEN: He has these big parties, 
and he's there until the very end. 
Totally social, greets everybody. 

PINE: I went to a party in Milan 
when I first started working with 
Armani. He came in very quietly 
and introduced himself to me. He 



doesn't speak much English, but 
he looked at me and gently pat- 
ted me on the cheek, said, "Bello," 
and shook my hand. Then he 
was off, because he had a bas- 
ketball game to go to. He owns 
the team in Milan. 

DE NIRO: He speaks about as 
much English as I speak Italian, 
so we meet in the middle. 

NEESON: My wife [Natasha 
Richardson] and I were invited 
to his home for a show. This 
was probably 1995. D'Angelo 
was performing, and it was 
pure theater. So fucking exciting. 
All these gorgeous girls and 
boys walking down with this 
equally gorgeous material on 
their bodies. And then Giorgio 
comes out in a simple, classic 
black T-shirt and pants. It was 
perfection. 

GERE: Giorgio does a sport 
jacket over jeans, and he wears 
T-shirts. It's not that far off from 
the way I dress. Of course, his 
T-shirts are cashmere, and mine 
are cotton. [Loughs] 

OWEN: I'm always impressed 
that, after the fashion show, he 
always looks the best. He comes 
out to the applause, and you go, 
"Well, that's the perfect outfit." 
He's very, very classy himself. 

HAMM: Italian men care about 
fashion and about looking good. 
Armani represents that ideal of 
not looking like too much effort 
went into it, even though a lot of 
effort went into it. 

BOSEMAN: You probably couldn't 
name anyone who's more recog- 
nizable, who's done it better 



for longer. You couldn't name 
another designer who's worked 
with as many stars and political 
figures. 

GERE: There's no one who works 
harder. This company is his art. In 
that sense, he's like an old-time 
artist. He's in his atelier making 
beautiful things all the time. 

JACKSON: To be a part of the 
Armani family is mind-blowing. To 
have that love for these clothes 
and this designer and to actually 
have a relationship with him? 
That's the stuff fantasies are 
made of. 

SCORSESE: It was a joy to work 
with Giorgio on Made in Milan, to 
be in his world, to see him at 
work. It was a very special time 
for me. I think we both have fond 
memories of making that picture. 

DE NIRO: I always wear his stuff 
at every awards show I go to. It's 
a standard thing for me, wearing 
his tuxedos. 

GERE: The reality is, I don't think 
I've ever worn a tuxedo that 
isn't his. And certainly other 
people have asked me to. But I 
have a sense of great loyalty. If 
I'm going to wear a tuxedo, it's 
going to be his. 

MARTIN: It's just elegance. 

When you want to feel elegant, 
you wear Mr. Armani. I enter 
his shops and I feel protected. 
They'll take care of me, down to 
every detail. I'm very thankful. 

NEESON: I'm loyal to him, and it's 
not just because of his generos- 
ity. I just think he's the fucking 
best, really. ■ 





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;• LAST WORD 


08 15 


BY MEREDITH BRYAN • PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS GORMAN 




(/) 

(D 



^ I ^ 

Why You’re 
Hearing About It 

Fasting’s been in the 
headlines since best 
sellers like The FastDiet 
popularized the “inter- . 
mittent” variety (short 
fasts punctuated by 
normal meals), trans- 
forming the idea of not 
eating from a form of 
political protest into 
a way to stay trim. 
Science is keeping 
pace with the publish- 
ing industry: In recent 
studies on mice, fasting 
both slowed signs of 
aging and extended life. 


The Big Promise 

Fasting might be the 
miracle cure we’ve 
been overlooking ever 
since our ancestors 
did it between hunts 
for woolly mammoths. 

In addition to helping 
you lose weight, some 
researchers think it 
could rejuvenate the 
immune system, im,- 
prove asthma, reduce 
high blood pressure, 
and delay the oiTset •' 
of Alzheimer’s. 

How it Worl^s^ , / 

Restricting calories, .• 
causes the body to un::. 
leash enzymes called ’ 
sirtuins, which are" 
thought to repair celj 
damage that can cause 
disease and aging. 

“It’s a way of life,” says 
The FastDiet coauthor 
Michael Mosley. “I’ve 
gotten used to.the idea 
that hunger comes and ‘ 
it goes away. I used to ' 
be a type-2 diabetic, j 
and now I'm fine.” • '~r ^ 


' 


The Pragmatic M.D. 

“Fasting appeals to 
people’s desire for a 
quick fix, but unless 
you stay with a pat- 
tern of healthy eating, 
you’ll not only defeat 
the benefits of the fast 
but potentially make 
things worse." — Joel 
Furhman, M.D., author 
of The End of Dieting 

^ Let’s Run the 
% Numbers 

21: Days In Gandhi’s 
''V_. longest hunger strike, 
which he did three 
times, starting in 1924 
44: Days David Blaine 
reportedly fasted in 
a box beside the 
Thames River in 2003 
16: Hours a day Hugh 
Jackman gave up food 
to get his Wolverine 
physique 

The Opposition 

- Toby Smithson, R.D.N., 
spokesperson for the 
Academy of Nutrition 

• and Dietetics, warns 
that fasting may encour- 
age the body to store 

• more fat in the long 
run. Plus, since there 
have been no long-term 
studies done on humans 
(just on rodents), the 
effects of prolonged 
fasting arp still unknown. 
And the extreme vari- 
ety — abstaining from 

all food and drink, 
minus water, for days or 
weeks — requires medi- 
cal supervision. ' 


-V. 




/'■ 



STARVATION 

NATION 

There ore a lot of 
ways to eot very 
little. Here ore 
the most popular 
methods for 
skipping meals. 

h THE 5:2 DIET 

THE METHOD: 

Mosley’s plan 
suggests sticking 
to 600 calories of 
protein and 
vegetables on your 
twice-weekly “fast" 
days and eating 
your normal diet 
the rest of the time. 
THE CLAIM: You’ll 
lose weight while 
improving insulin 
sensitivity, blood 
pressure, and 
cholesterol. 

THE 8-HOUR DIET 

THE METHOD: 

This is Fasting for 
Beginners: Eat 
whatever you want, 
but only during 
an eight-hour 
window each day. 
THE CLAIM: You’ll 
lose up to two and 
a half pounds per 
week, reduce your 
risk for Alzheimer’s, 
and grow new 
brain cells. 

THE EVERY- 
OTHER-DAY DIET 

THE METHOD: 

Obesity researcher 
Krista Varady’s diet 
book suggests limit- 
ing your intake every 
other day to one 
500-calorie meal. 
Otherwise, you 
eat regularly. 

THE CLAIM: You’ll 
retain more lean 
muscle mass. 


The Bottom Line 

If you’re trying to slim down, there are 
easier ways to do it (eat better, drink 
less alcohol), but the occasional fast 
probably won’t hurt. If you have high 
blood pressure or an autoimmune dis- 
order, abstaining may be worth consid- 
ering, but talk to your doctor first. 


100 DETAILS AUGUST 2015 


SET DESIGN BY KATE LANDUCCI FOR MARY HOWARD STUDIO. 






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